↓ Skip to main content

Transcriptomic signatures reveal immune dysregulation in human diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, August 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 915)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
23 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Transcriptomic signatures reveal immune dysregulation in human diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12920-018-0379-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Madhusudan Grover, Simon J. Gibbons, Asha A. Nair, Cheryl E. Bernard, Adeel S. Zubair, Seth T. Eisenman, Laura A. Wilson, Laura Miriel, Pankaj J. Pasricha, Henry P. Parkman, Irene Sarosiek, Richard W. McCallum, Kenneth L. Koch, Thomas L. Abell, William J. Snape, Braden Kuo, Robert J. Shulman, Travis J. McKenzie, Todd A. Kellogg, Michael L. Kendrick, James Tonascia, Frank A. Hamilton, Gianrico Farrugia

Abstract

Cellular changes described in human gastroparesis have revealed a role for immune dysregulation, however, a mechanistic understanding of human gastroparesis and the signaling pathways involved are still unclear. Diabetic gastroparetics, diabetic non-gastroparetic controls, idiopathic gastroparetics and non-diabetic non-gastroparetic controls underwent full-thickness gastric body biopsies. Deep RNA sequencing was performed and pathway analysis of differentially expressed transcripts was done using Ingenuity®. A subset of differentially expressed genes in diabetic gastroparesis was validated in a separate cohort using QT-PCR. 111 genes were differentially expressed in diabetic gastroparesis and 181 in idiopathic gastroparesis with a log2fold difference of | ≥ 2| and false detection rate (FDR) < 5%. Top canonical pathways in diabetic gastroparesis included genes involved with macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis pathway and differential regulation of cytokine production in macrophages and T helper cells by IL-17A and IL-17F. Top canonical pathways in idiopathic gastroparesis included genes involved in granulocyte adhesion and diapedesis, agranulocyte adhesion and diapedesis, and role of macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in rheumatoid arthritis. Sixty-five differentially expressed genes (log2fold difference | ≥ 2|, FDR < 5%) were common in both diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis with genes in the top 5 canonical pathways associated with immune signaling. 4/5 highly differentially expressed genes (SGK1, APOLD1, CXCR4, CXCL2, and FOS) in diabetic gastroparesis were validated in a separate cohort of patients using RT-PCR. Immune profile analysis revealed that genes associated with M1 (pro inflammatory) macrophages were enriched in tissues from idiopathic gastroparesis tissues compared to controls (p < 0.05). Diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis have both unique and overlapping transcriptomic signatures. Innate immune signaling likely plays a central role in pathogenesis of human gastroparesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Professor 2 10%
Other 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Neuroscience 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 5 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,404,488
of 17,370,809 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#50
of 915 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,923
of 284,264 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,370,809 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 915 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,264 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them