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Mono- versus polydrug abuse patterns among publicly funded clients

Overview of attention for article published in Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, November 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 279)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
67 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
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Title
Mono- versus polydrug abuse patterns among publicly funded clients
Published in
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, November 2007
DOI 10.1186/1747-597x-2-33
Pubmed ID
Authors

Satish Kedia, Marie A Sell, George Relyea

Abstract

To examine patterns of mono- versus polydrug abuse, data were obtained from intake records of 69,891 admissions to publicly funded treatment programs in Tennessee between 1998 and 2004. While descriptive statistics were employed to report frequency and patterns of mono- and polydrug abuse by demographic variables and by study years, bivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the probability of being a mono- or polydrug abuser for a number of demographic variables. The researchers found that during the study period 51.3% of admissions reported monodrug abuse and 48.7% reported polydrug abuse. Alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana were the most commonly abused substances, both alone and in combination. Odds ratio favored polydrug abuse for all but one drug category-other drugs. Gender did not affect drug abuse patterns; however, admissions for African Americans and those living in urban areas exhibited higher probabilities of polydrug abuse. Age group also appeared to affect drug abuse patterns, with higher odds of monodrug abuse among minors and adults over 45 years old. The discernable prevalence of polydrug abuse suggests a need for developing effective prevention strategies and treatment plans specific to polydrug abuse.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 51 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Master 5 10%
Researcher 5 10%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 10%
Social Sciences 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2015.
All research outputs
#318,683
of 6,367,740 outputs
Outputs from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#17
of 279 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,326
of 197,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#2
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,367,740 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 279 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 8 of them.