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Characterization of whole-genome autosomal differences of DNA methylation between men and women

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 538)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
22 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
130 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
140 Mendeley
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Title
Characterization of whole-genome autosomal differences of DNA methylation between men and women
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13072-015-0035-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paula Singmann, Doron Shem-Tov, Simone Wahl, Harald Grallert, Giovanni Fiorito, So-Youn Shin, Katharina Schramm, Petra Wolf, Sonja Kunze, Yael Baran, Simonetta Guarrera, Paolo Vineis, Vittorio Krogh, Salvatore Panico, Rosario Tumino, Anja Kretschmer, Christian Gieger, Annette Peters, Holger Prokisch, Caroline L. Relton, Giuseppe Matullo, Thomas Illig, Melanie Waldenberger, Eran Halperin

Abstract

Disease risk and incidence between males and females reveal differences, and sex is an important component of any investigation of the determinants of phenotypes or disease etiology. Further striking differences between men and women are known, for instance, at the metabolic level. The extent to which men and women vary at the level of the epigenome, however, is not well documented. DNA methylation is the best known epigenetic mechanism to date. In order to shed light on epigenetic differences, we compared autosomal DNA methylation levels between men and women in blood in a large prospective European cohort of 1799 subjects, and replicated our findings in three independent European cohorts. We identified and validated 1184 CpG sites to be differentially methylated between men and women and observed that these CpG sites were distributed across all autosomes. We showed that some of the differentially methylated loci also exhibit differential gene expression between men and women. Finally, we found that the differentially methylated loci are enriched among imprinted genes, and that their genomic location in the genome is concentrated in CpG island shores. Our epigenome-wide association study indicates that differences between men and women are so substantial that they should be considered in design and analyses of future studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 135 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 27%
Researcher 29 21%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Student > Master 11 8%
Professor 8 6%
Other 23 16%
Unknown 16 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 13%
Neuroscience 4 3%
Computer Science 3 2%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 24 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2015.
All research outputs
#1,472,997
of 20,830,231 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#34
of 538 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,347
of 300,454 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#7
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,830,231 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 538 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,454 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.