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The effect of mother and newborn early skin-to-skin contact on initiation of breastfeeding, newborn temperature and duration of third stage of labor

Overview of attention for article published in International Breastfeeding Journal, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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54 Dimensions

Readers on

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312 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of mother and newborn early skin-to-skin contact on initiation of breastfeeding, newborn temperature and duration of third stage of labor
Published in
International Breastfeeding Journal, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13006-018-0174-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kolsoom Safari, Awaz Aziz Saeed, Shukir Saleem Hasan, Lida Moghaddam-Banaem

Abstract

Mother and newborn skin-to-skin contact (SSC) after birth brings about numerous protective effects; however, it is an intervention that is underutilized in Iraq where a globally considerable rate of maternal and child death has been reported. The present study was conducted in order to assess the effects of SCC on initiation of breastfeeding, newborn temperature, and duration of the third stage of labor. A quasi-experimental study was conducted on 108 healthy women and their neonates (56 in the intervention group who received SSC and 52 in the routine care group) at Hawler maternity teaching hospital of Erbil, Iraq from February to May, 2017. Data were collected via structured interviews and the LATCH scale to document breastfeeding sessions. The mean age of the mothers in the SSC and routine care groups were 26.29 ± 6.13 (M ± SD) and 26.02 ± 5.94 (M ± SD) respectively. Based on the LATCH scores, 48% of mothers who received SSC and 46% with routine care had successful breastfeeding. Newborns who received SSC initiated breastfeeding within 2.41 ± 1.38 (M ± SD) minutes after birth; however, newborns who received routine care started breastfeeding in 5.48 ± 5.7 (M ± SD) minutes. Duration of the third stage of labor in mothers who practiced SSC after birth was 6 ± 1.7 min, compared to 8.02 ± 3.6 min for mothers who were provided with routine care (p <  0.001). Moreover, the prevalence of hypothermia in the newborns who received SSC and routine care was 2 and 42% respectively. Results remained unchanged after using regression modelling to adjust for potential factors and background characteristics. Skin-to-skin contact provides an appropriate and affordable yet high quality alternative to technology. It is easily implemented, even in small hospitals of very low-income countries, and has the potential to save newborns' and mothers' lives. It is necessary to prioritize training of health providers to implement essential newborn care including SSC. Community engagement is also needed to ensure that all women and their families understand the benefits of SSC and early initiation of breastfeeding. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03548389.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 312 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 312 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 42 13%
Student > Bachelor 41 13%
Student > Postgraduate 15 5%
Researcher 13 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 4%
Other 47 15%
Unknown 142 46%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 84 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 12%
Social Sciences 11 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 2%
Other 20 6%
Unknown 146 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2020.
All research outputs
#5,765,370
of 17,730,520 outputs
Outputs from International Breastfeeding Journal
#234
of 411 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,793
of 284,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Breastfeeding Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,730,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 411 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,644 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them