↓ Skip to main content

The complete mitochondrial genome of Anoplocephala perfoliata, the first representative for the family Anoplocephalidae

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The complete mitochondrial genome of Anoplocephala perfoliata, the first representative for the family Anoplocephalidae
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1172-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aijiang Guo

Abstract

Mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences are widely used to understand phylogenetic relationships among parasites. However, no complete mt genome sequence is available in the family Anoplocephalidae to date. This study sequenced and annotated the complete mt genome of Anoplocephala perfoliata (Anoplocephalidae), and investigated its phylogenetic relationships with other species from the families Hymenolepididae, Dipylidiidae and Taeniidae of the order Cyclophyllidea using the amino acid sequences of the 12 proteins in their mt genomes. The complete mt genome of A. perfoliata was amplified by Long-range PCR, sequenced using primer walking and annotated by comparing with those of other cestodes. Its phylogenetic relationship with the species from the families Hymenolepididae, Dipylidiidae and Taeniidae was inferred using the 12 protein sequences based on Maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. The complete circular mt genome sequence for A. perfoliata is 14,459 bp in size, and includes 12 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes and 22 tRNA genes. The mt gene arrangement of A. perfoliata is identical to those of previously reported Hymenolepis diminuta (Hymenolepididae) and Dipylidium caninum (Dipylidiidae), but slightly different from those of other taeniids due to an order switch between tRNA(S2) and tRNA(L1). The phylogenetic analyses showed that the Dipylidiidae was more closely related to Anoplocephalidae and Hymenolepididae than to Taeniidae. The relationship among the four families obtained by Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inferences based on predicted amino acid sequences of protein-coding genes is consistent with that based on their mt gene arrangement similarities. This study determined the first mt genome for the family Anoplocephalidae, providing rich sources for selecting useful molecular markers for ecological and phylogenetic studies. Analyses on mt genome sequences of the four families of cestodes provide novel insights into their phylogenetic relationships. Of couse, more taxon sampling is necessary for future phylogenetic studies of these cestodes using mt genome sequences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 32%
Researcher 5 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 18%
Student > Master 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,314,444
of 8,133,552 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,274
of 2,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,133
of 243,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#104
of 180 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,133,552 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,254 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,572 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 180 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.