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“Everything else comes first”: a mixed-methods analysis of barriers to health behaviors among military spouses

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
“Everything else comes first”: a mixed-methods analysis of barriers to health behaviors among military spouses
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5938-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily L. Mailey, Carrie Mershon, Jillian Joyce, Brandon C. Irwin

Abstract

Military spouses are integral to the health of their families, but have demonstrated elevated levels of stress, depression, and anxiety. Participating in health behaviors such as physical activity and healthy eating may have a positive impact on spouses' physical and mental health, but emerging evidence suggests spouses' participation in these behaviors is scarce. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the most frequently reported barriers to health behaviors among military spouses. Military spouses were recruited to complete surveys (N = 230) or participate in focus group sessions (N = 22). On the surveys, participants indicated up to 3 of their most frequent barriers to physical activity, diet, social connection, and stress management. Responses were coded and summed to identify the most commonly reported barriers to each health behavior. Subsequently, focus group sessions were conducted to gain a more in-depth understanding of the challenges military spouses face when trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Focus group transcripts were coded using thematic data analysis to identify the most frequently discussed barriers for each behavior. On the surveys, lack of time was the most prevalent barrier for physical activity, social connection, and stress management, and the second most prevalent barrier for diet. Financial concerns were the most prevalent barrier to maintaining a healthy diet. Barriers related to parent/family responsibilities were commonly reported across all health behaviors. During the focus group sessions, the transient military lifestyle was reported to have a significant impact on all of the health behaviors. Other military-related stressors including deployments and the necessity to "do it all" alone were frequently discussed. Many participants exhibited rigid definitions of what "counts" as exercise or health eating. Overall, participants reported sacrificing participation in health behaviors to attend to other priorities. Military spouses reported numerous barriers to health behaviors that made it difficult for them to prioritize their own health and well-being. Although some of the barriers reported were similar to barriers reported by civilians, unique stressors associated with military life further impeded participation in health behaviors. These findings can be used to inform future health promotion interventions for military spouses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 15 31%
Social Sciences 8 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 8%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2021.
All research outputs
#702,797
of 17,370,809 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#716
of 11,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,727
of 235,939 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,370,809 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,736 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,939 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.