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Time-use and environmental determinants of dropout from organized youth football and tennis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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33 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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113 Mendeley
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Title
Time-use and environmental determinants of dropout from organized youth football and tennis
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5919-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ineke Deelen, Dick Ettema, Carlijn B. M. Kamphuis

Abstract

Many adolescents drop out of organized sports. Lack of motivation and competing priorities are known as important reasons for dropout. However, time use factors as well as environmental determinants have been largely neglected in the current literature on dropout from youth sports. The aim of this study is to investigate how (changes in) time use and characteristics of the physical environment determine dropout from football and tennis among adolescents. Data on time use and background characteristics were collected through online surveys in 2015 and 2016 among adolescents aged 13-21 (N = 2555), including both the dropped outs and those who still continued membership of their football or tennis clubs. Physical environmental determinants (travel distance to the sports club, and neighbourhood density) were measured objectively. Binary logistic regression analyses were carried out for football and tennis separately to examine the associations between time use (time spent on various activities and changes related to the school and job situation), and environmental factors on the probability of dropping out from sports. Time spent on sports outside the context of the sports club, and time spent on social or voluntary activities at the sports club was positively associated with continuing being football and tennis members. Tennis players who changed schools or participated in two sports at the same time had a higher probability of dropping out, whereas tennis players who travelled greater distances from home to the tennis club were less likely to drop out. Determinants of dropout differed between football and tennis. However, time use variables were important predictors of dropout from football as well as tennis, whereas environmental determinants hardly contributed to the prediction of dropout. To keep youths involved in organized sports, this study recommends that sports professionals should: 1) offer flexibility in training and competition schedules, 2) stimulate participation in social activities and voluntary work at the sports club, 3) pay special attention to their needs and preferences, and 4) encourage possibilities to practice and play sports outside of regular training hours, for instance at the sports club or at playgrounds or parks in the neighbourhood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 113 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 113 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 21 19%
Unknown 35 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 38 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 6%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Psychology 5 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 42 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 December 2021.
All research outputs
#1,100,871
of 21,419,046 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,186
of 13,903 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,538
of 300,724 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#4
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,419,046 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,903 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,724 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.