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Required duration of mass ivermectin treatment for onchocerciasis elimination in Africa: a comparative modelling analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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72 Dimensions

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74 Mendeley
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Title
Required duration of mass ivermectin treatment for onchocerciasis elimination in Africa: a comparative modelling analysis
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1159-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wilma A. Stolk, Martin Walker, Luc E. Coffeng, María-Gloria Basáñez, Sake J. de Vlas

Abstract

The World Health Organization (WHO) has set ambitious targets for the elimination of onchocerciasis by 2020-2025 through mass ivermectin treatment. Two different mathematical models have assessed the feasibility of reaching this goal for different settings and treatment scenarios, namely the individual-based microsimulation model ONCHOSIM and the population-based deterministic model EPIONCHO. In this study, we harmonize some crucial assumptions and compare model predictions on common outputs. Using a range of initial endemicity levels and treatment scenarios, we compared the models with respect to the following outcomes: 1) model-predicted trends in microfilarial (mf) prevalence and mean mf intensity during 25 years of (annual or biannual) mass ivermectin treatment; 2) treatment duration needed to bring mf prevalence below a provisional operational threshold for treatment interruption (pOTTIS, i.e. 1.4 %), and 3) treatment duration needed to drive the parasite population to local elimination, even in the absence of further interventions. Local elimination was judged by stochastic fade-out in ONCHOSIM and by reaching transmission breakpoints in EPIONCHO. ONCHOSIM and EPIONCHO both predicted that in mesoendemic areas the pOTTIS can be reached with annual treatment, but that this strategy may be insufficient in very highly hyperendemic areas or would require prolonged continuation of treatment. For the lower endemicity levels explored, ONCHOSIM predicted that the time needed to reach the pOTTIS is longer than that needed to drive the parasite population to elimination, whereas for the higher endemicity levels the opposite was true. In EPIONCHO, the pOTTIS was reached consistently sooner than the breakpoint. The operational thresholds proposed by APOC may have to be adjusted to adequately reflect differences in pre-control endemicities. Further comparative modelling work will be conducted to better understand the main causes of differences in model-predicted trends. This is a pre-requisite for guiding elimination programmes in Africa and refining operational criteria for stopping mass treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 71 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 20%
Researcher 14 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 26%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Mathematics 3 4%
Computer Science 3 4%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 12 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2021.
All research outputs
#5,614,981
of 17,381,824 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,417
of 4,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,049
of 290,811 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#100
of 443 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,381,824 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,557 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,811 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 443 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.