↓ Skip to main content

Spontaneous remission of fully symptomatic visceral leishmaniasis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Spontaneous remission of fully symptomatic visceral leishmaniasis
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1191-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oussama Mouri, Mathilde Benhamou, Gaëlle Leroux, Nathalie Chartrel, Alain Devidas, Marc Thellier, Zahir Amoura, Nathalie Costedoat-Chalumeau, Pierre Buffet

Abstract

Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), i.e., infection with Leishmania sp. associated with high fever, weight loss, massive splenomegaly and markedly altered laboratory parameters, is generally fatal if untreated. The possibility of transient spontaneous remission of fully symptomatic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has been mentioned but, to our knowledge) has never been documented. We report the first documented history of a patient with overt, confirmed VL experiencing a complete remission in the absence of any anti-leishmanial therapy. The diagnosis of VL at the time of the self-resolving episode was strongly suspected based on clinical presentation and presence of antileishmanial antibody, then unequivocally confirmed years later by the presence of an amastigote on a stored smear and the positive quantitative PCR with Leishmania-specific primers from the material scraped from this same slide CONCLUSION: This report demonstrates that complete spontaneous remission may occur in patients with overt, fully symptomatic VL. VL should therefore be considered in cases of self-resolving or relapsing episodes of fever of unknown origin. Confirmation should be based on both serological tests and specific PCR on a blood sample.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 22%
Student > Master 4 15%
Other 3 11%
Researcher 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 6 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2016.
All research outputs
#12,651,928
of 16,578,610 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,838
of 5,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,797
of 287,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#386
of 583 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,578,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,982 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,841 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 583 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.