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Synchronous birth is a dominant pattern in receptor-ligand evolution

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Synchronous birth is a dominant pattern in receptor-ligand evolution
Published in
BMC Genomics, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4977-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Grandchamp, Philippe Monget

Abstract

Interactions between proteins are key components in the chemical and physical processes of living organisms. Among these interactions, membrane receptors and their ligands are particularly important because they are at the interface between extracellular and intracellular environments. Many studies have investigated how binding partners have co-evolved in genomes during the evolution. However, little is known about the establishment of the interaction on a phylogenetic scale. In this study, we systematically studied the time of birth of genes encoding human membrane receptors and their ligands in the animal tree of life. We examined a total of 553 pairs of ligands/receptors, representing non-redundant interactions. We found that 41% of the receptors and their respective first ligands appeared in the same branch, representing 2.5-fold more than expected by chance, thus suggesting an evolutionary dynamic of interdependence and conservation between these partners. In contrast, 21% of the receptors appeared after their ligand, i.e. three-fold less often than expected by chance. Most surprisingly, 38% of the receptors appeared before their first ligand, as much as expected by chance. According to these results, we propose that a selective pressure is exerted on ligands and receptors once they appear, that would remove molecules whose partner does not appear quickly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Student > Postgraduate 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 36%
Chemistry 3 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Environmental Science 1 9%
Neuroscience 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2019.
All research outputs
#3,402,933
of 14,155,626 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,736
of 8,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,860
of 275,195 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,155,626 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,322 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,195 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.