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Proteomic and metabolomic profiles demonstrate variation among free-living and symbiotic vibrio fischeri biofilms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, October 2015
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Title
Proteomic and metabolomic profiles demonstrate variation among free-living and symbiotic vibrio fischeri biofilms
Published in
BMC Microbiology, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0560-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alba Chavez-Dozal, Clayton Gorman, Michele K. Nishiguchi

Abstract

A number of bacterial species are capable of growing in various life history modes that enable their survival and persistence in both planktonic free-living stages as well as in biofilm communities. Mechanisms contributing to either planktonic cell or biofilm persistence and survival can be carefully delineated using multiple differential techniques (e.g., genomics and transcriptomics). In this study, we present both proteomic and metabolomic analyses of Vibrio fischeri biofilms, demonstrating the potential for combined differential studies for elucidating life-history switches important for establishing the mutualism through biofilm formation and host colonization. The study used a metabolomics/proteomics or "meta-proteomics" approach, referring to the combined protein and metabolic data analysis that bridges the gap between phenotypic changes (planktonic cell to biofilm formation) with genotypic changes (reflected in protein/metabolic profiles). Our methods used protein shotgun construction, followed by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) detection and quantification for both free-living and biofilm forming V. fischeri. We present a time-resolved picture of approximately 100 proteins (2D-PAGE and shotgun proteomics) and 200 metabolites that are present during the transition from planktonic growth to community biofilm formation. Proteins involved in stress response, DNA repair damage, and transport appeared to be highly expressed during the biofilm state. In addition, metabolites detected in biofilms correspond to components of the exopolysaccharide (EPS) matrix (sugars and glycerol-derived). Alterations in metabolic enzymes were paralleled by more pronounced changes in concentration of intermediates from the glycolysis pathway as well as several amino acids. This combined analysis of both types of information (proteins, metabolites) has provided a more complete picture of the biochemical processes of biofilm formation and what determines the switch between the two life history strategies. The reported findings have broad implications for Vibrio biofilm ecology, and mechanisms for successful survival in the host and environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 33%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Master 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 39%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 10%
Environmental Science 4 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 10 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,038,272
of 7,965,219 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#925
of 1,336 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,735
of 242,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#51
of 83 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,336 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.