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Prevalence, associated factors and predictors of anxiety: a community survey in Selangor, Malaysia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, October 2015
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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276 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence, associated factors and predictors of anxiety: a community survey in Selangor, Malaysia
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0648-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Siti Fatimah Kader Maideen, Sherina Mohd Sidik, Lekhraj Rampal, Firdaus Mukhtar

Abstract

Anxiety is the most common mental health disorders in the general population. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of anxiety, its associated factors and the predictors of anxiety among adults in the community of Selangor, Malaysia. A cross sectional study was carried out in three districts in Selangor, Malaysia. The inclusion criteria of this study were Malaysian citizens, adults aged 18 years and above, and living in the selected living quarters based on the list provided by the Department of Statistics Malaysia (DOS). Participants completed a set of questionnaires, including the validated Malay version of Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD 7) to detect anxiety. Of the 2512 participants who were approached, 1556 of them participated in the study (61.90 %). Based on the cut-off point of 8 and above in the GAD-7, the prevalence of anxiety was 8.2 %. Based on the initial multiple logistic regression analysis, the predictors of anxiety were depression, serious problems at work, domestic violence and high perceived stress. When reanalyzed again after removing depression, low self-esteem and high perceived stress, six predictors that were identified are cancer, serious problems at work, domestic violence, unhappy relationship with family, non-organizational religious activity and intrinsic religiosity. This study reports the prevalence of anxiety among adults in the community of Selangor, Malaysia and also the magnitude of the associations between various factors and anxiety.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 276 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 274 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 66 24%
Student > Master 48 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 9%
Student > Postgraduate 17 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 5%
Other 47 17%
Unknown 60 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 77 28%
Psychology 32 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 12%
Social Sciences 15 5%
Computer Science 6 2%
Other 49 18%
Unknown 65 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2016.
All research outputs
#11,039,020
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,526
of 3,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,663
of 285,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#245
of 301 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,293 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,065 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 301 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.