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Enhanced osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone: a comparative analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, October 2015
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2 tweeters

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34 Dimensions

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Enhanced osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone: a comparative analysis
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0193-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph S. Fernandez-Moure, Bruna Corradetti, Paige Chan, Jeffrey L. Van Eps, Trevor Janecek, Pranela Rameshwar, Bradley K. Weiner, Ennio Tasciotti

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise for regenerative therapies in the musculoskeletal system. Although MSCs from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) and adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) have been extensively characterized, there is still debate as to the ideal source of MSCs for tissue-engineering applications in bone repair. MSCs were isolated from cortical bone fragments (CBF-MSCs) obtained from patients undergoing laminectomy, selected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and tested for their potential to undergo mesodermic differentiation. CBF-MSCs were then compared with BM-MSCs and AD-MSCs for their colony-forming unit capability and osteogenic potential in both normoxia and hypoxia. After 2 and 4 weeks in inducing media, differentiation was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by the evaluation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression and mineral deposition (Von Kossa staining). Transcriptional activity of osteoblastogenesis-associated genes (Alp, RUNX2, Spp1, and Bglap) was also analyzed. The cortical fraction of the bone contains a subset of cells positive for MSC-associated markers and capable of tri-lineage differentiation. The hypoxic conditions were generally more effective in inducing osteogenesis for the three cell lines. However, at 2 and 4 weeks, greater calcium deposition and ALP expression were observed in both hypoxic and normoxic conditions in CBF-MSCs compared with AD- and BM-MSCs. These functional observations were further corroborated by gene expression analysis, which showed a significant upregulation of Bglap, Alp, and Spp1, with a 22.50 (±4.55)-, 46.56 (±7.4)-, 71.46 (±4.16)-fold increase compared with their uninduced counterparts. This novel population of MSCs retains a greater biosynthetic activity in vitro, which was found increased in hypoxic conditions. The present study demonstrates that quantitative differences between MSCs retrieved from bone marrow, adipose, and the cortical portion of the bone with respect to their osteogenic potential exist and suggests the cortical bone as suitable candidate to use for orthopedic tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 29%
Student > Master 8 23%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Engineering 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2015.
All research outputs
#3,574,128
of 7,128,756 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#324
of 545 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,095
of 238,896 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#34
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,128,756 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 545 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,896 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.