↓ Skip to main content

Sugar and artificially sweetened beverage consumption and adiposity changes: National longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
38 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
177 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Sugar and artificially sweetened beverage consumption and adiposity changes: National longitudinal study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0297-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony A Laverty, Lucia Magee, Carlos A. Monteiro, Sonia Saxena, Christopher Millett

Abstract

In response to increasing policy action and public concern about the negative health effects of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), there is increased promotion of artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). These have been linked with obesity and diabetes in recent experimental work. This study examined associations between SSB and ASB consumption and changes in adiposity in a nationally representative sample of UK children. We conducted a longitudinal study of 13,170 children aged 7-11 years in the UK Millennium Cohort Study, collected in 2008 and 2012. Logistic regression was used to assess socio-demographic and behavioural correlates of weekly SSB and ASB consumption at 11 years. Linear regression examined associations between SSB/ASB consumption and changes in adiposity measures between 7 and 11 years. Boys were more likely to consume SSBs weekly (62.3 % v 59.1 %) than girls at age 11 years. South Asian children were more likely to consume SSBs weekly (78.8 % v 58.4 %) but less likely to consume ASBsweekly (51.7 % v 66.3 %) than White children. Daily SSB consumption was associated with increases in percentage body fat between ages 7 and 11 (+0.57 %, 95 % confidence intervals 0.30;0.83). Daily ASB consumption was associated with increased percentage body fat at age 11 (+1.18 kg/m(2), 0.81;1.54) and greater increases between ages 7 and 11 (+0.35 kg/m(2), 0.09;0.61). Consumption of SSBs and ASBs was associated with BMI and percentage body fat increases in UK children. Obesity prevention strategies which encourage the substitution of SSBs with ASBs may not yield the adiposity benefits originally intended and this area should be a focus for further research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 177 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 173 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 43 24%
Student > Bachelor 31 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 14%
Researcher 19 11%
Student > Postgraduate 8 5%
Other 21 12%
Unknown 31 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 17%
Social Sciences 17 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 8%
Psychology 11 6%
Other 24 14%
Unknown 37 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2017.
All research outputs
#654,473
of 15,919,321 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#270
of 1,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,311
of 287,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#31
of 155 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,919,321 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,565 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,146 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 155 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.