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Quantitative autism symptom patterns recapitulate differential mechanisms of genetic transmission in single and multiple incidence families

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, October 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
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1 peer review site
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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80 Mendeley
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Title
Quantitative autism symptom patterns recapitulate differential mechanisms of genetic transmission in single and multiple incidence families
Published in
Molecular Autism, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13229-015-0050-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas W Frazier, Eric A Youngstrom, Antonio Y Hardan, Stelios Georgiades, John N Constantino, Charis Eng, Thomas W. Frazier, Eric A. Youngstrom, Antonio Y. Hardan, John N. Constantino

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated aggregation of autistic traits in undiagnosed family members of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which has significant implications for ASD risk in their offspring. This study capitalizes upon a large, quantitatively characterized clinical-epidemiologic family sample to establish the extent to which family transmission pattern and sex modulate ASD trait aggregation. Data were analyzed from 5515 siblings (2657 non-ASD and 2858 ASD) included in the Interactive Autism Network. Autism symptom levels were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and by computing Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) symptom scores based on items from the SRS and Social Communication Questionnaire. Generalized estimating equation models evaluated the influence of family incidence types (single versus multiple incidence families; male-only ASD-affected families versus families with female ASD-affected children), diagnostic group (non-ASD children with and without a history of language delay with autistic speech and ASD-affected children), and sibling sex on ASD symptom levels. Non-ASD children manifested elevated ASD symptom burden when they were members of multiple incidence families-this effect was accentuated for male children in female ASD-containing families-or when they had a history of language delay with autistic qualities of speech. In this sample, ASD-affected children from multiple incidence families had lower symptom levels than their counterparts in single incidence families. Recurrence risk for ASD was higher for children from female ASD-containing families than for children from male-only families. Sex and patterns of family transmission modulate the risk of autism symptom burden in undiagnosed siblings of ASD-affected children. Identification of these symptoms/traits and their molecular genetic causes may have significant implications for genetic counseling and for understanding inherited liabilities that confer risk for ASD in successive generations. Autism symptom elevations were more dramatic in non-ASD children from multiple incidence families and those with a history of language delay and autistic qualities of speech, identifying sub-groups at substantially greater transmission risk. Higher symptom burden and greater recurrence in children from female ASD-containing families indicate that familial aggregation patterns are further qualified by sex-specific thresholds, supportive of the notion that females require a higher burden of deleterious liability to cross into categorical ASD diagnosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 78 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 19%
Student > Master 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 25 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Neuroscience 6 8%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2016.
All research outputs
#2,886,689
of 11,426,369 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#236
of 367 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,766
of 251,228 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#10
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,426,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 367 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.1. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,228 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.