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Analysis of zebrafish (Danio rerio) behavior in response to bacterial infection using a self-organizing map

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, October 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Analysis of zebrafish (Danio rerio) behavior in response to bacterial infection using a self-organizing map
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12917-015-0579-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sang-Bin Lee, Yunjeong Choe, Tae-Soo Chon, Ho Young Kang

Abstract

Animal behavioral responses have been recently established as a suitable tool for detecting contaminants in the environment for risk assessment in situ. In this study, we observed movement behavior of zebrafish (Danio rerio) before and after infection with Edwardsiella tarda CK41 for 3 days until death. Infection status of zebrafish was confirmed through PCR and colonization assay as time progressed and lesion development in the tails of zebrafish was also examined. Movement behaviors in response to bacterial infection were patterned by self-organizing map (SOM) based on movement parameters, including speed (mm/s), acceleration (mm/s (2) ), stop duration (t), stop number (n), locomotory rate (mm/s), turning rate (rad/s), and meander (rad/mm). According to SOM result, clusters were identified firstly according to time and secondly according to infection. Two movement patterns were observed in the early period of infection: one group with minimum turning rate and meander (i.e., stiff movement) and the other group with maximum strop number. Late infection was characterized by long stop duration. SOM was suitable for extracting complex behavioral data and thus can serve as a referencing system for diagnosing disease development in order to reveal the mechanism of the infection process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 18%
Engineering 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2016.
All research outputs
#5,922,852
of 8,183,022 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#690
of 1,236 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,316
of 244,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#24
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,183,022 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,236 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,952 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.