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Smoking, smoking cessation, and 7-year mortality in a cohort of Thai adults

Overview of attention for article published in Population Health Metrics, October 2015
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Smoking, smoking cessation, and 7-year mortality in a cohort of Thai adults
Published in
Population Health Metrics, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12963-015-0062-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jiaying Zhao, Cha-aim Pachanee, Vasoontara Yiengprugsawan, Sam-ang Seubsman, Adrian Sleigh

Abstract

Smoking is a strong risk factor for mortality in both the developed and the developing world. However, there is still limited research to examine the impact of smoking cessation and mortality in middle-income Southeast Asian populations. We use longitudinal data from a large Thai cohort of adult Open University students residing nationwide, linked with official death records to assess the association of smoking status and mortality risks during a 7-year follow-up. The log-rank test was used to evaluate the statistical probability of differential survival according to baseline smoking status. Multivariate hazard ratios (HR) were reported for smoking status and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. From 2005 baseline to 2012, current smokers were more likely to die than cohort members who ceased smoking and never smokers (1.9 vs 1.3 vs 0.6 %, p < 0.05). The hazard of all-cause mortality increased with the daily amount of cigarette consumption among both current and former smokers. Cause of death analyses showed that current male smokers had a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease related mortality (HR 3.9 [95 % CI 1.8-8.1]). Former male smokers had a moderate increase in risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases compared to never smokers (HR 1.6 [95 % CI 0.7-3.4]). Current male smokers between 2005 and 2009 experienced highest subsequent mortality hazards during the period 2009-2012 compared to never smokers (HR 2.1 [95 % CI 1.4-3.4]). The higher risk of dying reduced if people quit smoking during the 2005-2009 follow-up period (HR 1.5 [95 % CI 0.7-3.3]). Risk for mortality fell even further among long-term quitters (HR 1.4 [95 % CI 0.9-2.2]). Among a large nationwide cohort of Thai adults, current smokers were at a significantly and substantially higher risk of all-cause mortality, especially cardiovascular-related mortality. The higher risk of dying fell if people quit smoking and the risk for mortality was even lower among long-term quitters. Promotion of smoking cessation will contribute substantially to the reduction in avoidable mortality in Thailand.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 7%
Unknown 27 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 28%
Student > Master 7 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 41%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Psychology 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2015.
All research outputs
#3,149,183
of 11,333,579 outputs
Outputs from Population Health Metrics
#105
of 263 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,928
of 251,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Population Health Metrics
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,333,579 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 263 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,857 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.