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Intra-aural tick bite causing unilateral facial nerve palsy in 29 cases over 16 years in Kandy, Sri Lanka: is rickettsial aetiology possible?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2018
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Title
Intra-aural tick bite causing unilateral facial nerve palsy in 29 cases over 16 years in Kandy, Sri Lanka: is rickettsial aetiology possible?
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3338-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Senanayake A. M. Kularatne, Ranjan Fernando, Sinnadurai Selvaratnam, Chandrasiri Narampanawa, Kosala Weerakoon, Sujanthe Wickramasinghe, Manoji Pathirage, Vajira Weerasinghe, Anura Bandara, Jayanthe Rajapakse

Abstract

Over the last two decades intra-aural tick infestation (otoacariasis) has been a common occurrence in the hilly central region in Sri Lanka. Very occasional detection of isolated unilateral facial nerve palsy associated with otoacariasis attributed to toxin damage of the nerve prompted us to study the clinico-epidemiology and aetio-pathology of the problem. All cases having isolated unilateral facial nerve palsy associated with otoacariasis presented to, Ear Nose and Throat clinic at General Hospital Kandy, Sri Lanka from 2001 to 2016 were included in the study. The facial palsies were assessed with nerve conduction studies and, harvested ticks were identified. There were 29 patients with mean age of 46 years (range 22-76 years) with male to female ratio of 1:1.9. First 12 patients without specific treatment took 1-55 months for recovery and 4 had axonal degeneration. Last 5 patients were treated with doxycycline and recovered in 4 weeks. They had strong sero-conversion of immunofluorescence antibodies against spotted fever rickettsioses and the tick harvested from the last patient was PCR positive for rickettsial DNA. Identified ticks belonged to Dermacentor, Amblyomma, Rhipicephalus and Hyalomma species. On contrary to popular toxin theory, we were able to demonstrate treatable rickettsial aetio-pathology as the cause of otoacariasis associated lower motor facial palsy in Sri Lanka.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Professor 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Lecturer 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Unknown 6 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 7%
Unknown 7 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,239,997
of 13,429,000 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,167
of 5,003 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,797
of 267,762 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
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