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Differential effects of diesel exhaust particles on T cell differentiation and autoimmune disease

Overview of attention for article published in Particle and Fibre Toxicology, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

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4 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Differential effects of diesel exhaust particles on T cell differentiation and autoimmune disease
Published in
Particle and Fibre Toxicology, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12989-018-0271-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chelsea A. O’Driscoll, Leah A. Owens, Madeline E. Gallo, Erica J. Hoffmann, Amin Afrazi, Mei Han, John H. Fechner, James J. Schauer, Christopher A. Bradfield, Joshua D. Mezrich

Abstract

Exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been associated with increased incidence and severity of autoimmune disease. Diesel PM is primarily composed of an elemental carbon core and adsorbed organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and contributes up to 40% of atmospheric PM. The organic fraction (OF) of PM excludes all metals and inorganics and retains most organic compounds, such as PAHs. Both PM and OF increase inflammation in vitro and aggravate autoimmune disease in humans. PAHs are known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands. The AHR modulates T cell differentiation and effector function in vitro and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of autoimmune disease. This study aims to identify whether the total mass or active components of PM are responsible for activating pathways associated with exposure to PM and autoimmune disease. This study tests the hypothesis that active components present in diesel PM and their OF enhance effector T cell differentiation and aggravate autoimmune disease. Two different diesel samples, each characterized for their components, were tested for their effects on autoimmunity. Both diesel PM enhanced effector T cell differentiation in an AHR-dose-dependent manner and suppressed regulatory T cell differentiation in vitro. Both diesel PM aggravated EAE in vivo. Fractionated diesel OFs exhibited the same effects as PM in vitro, but unlike PM, only one diesel OF aggravated EAE. Additionally, both synthetic PAH mixtures that represent specific PAHs found in the two diesel PM samples enhanced Th17 differentiation, however one lost this effect after metabolism and only one required the AHR. These findings suggest that active components of PM and not total mass are driving T cell responses in vitro, but in vivo the PM matrix and complex mixtures adsorbed to the particles, not just the OF, are contributing to the observed EAE effects. This implies that examining OF alone may not be sufficient in vivo. These data further suggest that bioavailability and metabolism of organics, especially PAHs, may have an important role in vivo.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 10 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Other 11 31%
Unknown 9 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2019.
All research outputs
#7,926,220
of 15,283,645 outputs
Outputs from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#209
of 450 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,975
of 276,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,283,645 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 450 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,567 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them