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Case-control study of glucocorticoid receptor and corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptor gene variants and risk of perinatal depression

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2015
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Title
Case-control study of glucocorticoid receptor and corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptor gene variants and risk of perinatal depression
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0720-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ene-Choo Tan, Tze-Ern Chua, Theresa M. Y. Lee, Hui-San Tan, Joe L. Y. Ting, Helen Y. Chen

Abstract

Depression during pregnancy or after childbirth is the most frequent perinatal illness affecting women of reproductive age. It could result in unfavourable outcomes for both women and their newborns. The incidence of perinatal depression is higher for those with family history of depression and other mental illness, suggesting the contribution of genetic factors. There is postulation that disruption or fluctuation of reproductive hormones could play a part in women who are sensitive to such changes. This is a case-control study comparing the frequencies of candidate gene variants in patients with perinatal depression with controls. Patients of Chinese descent (N = 725) were recruited from the outpatient clinics of the hospital between 2010 and 2013. Controls were patients who came for postnatal consultations at the obstetrics clinics and scored ≤ 7 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at the postnatal screening programme of the hospital. Cases with confirmed diagnosis of clinical (major) depression related to pregnancy/postpartum were recruited from the hospital's outpatient clinic. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva samples and genotyped for the polymorphisms of interest. Differences between groups were assessed by chi-square analysis. CRHR1 rs242939 and rs1876828 were not polymorphic in the study population. There was no statistically significant association of perinatal depression for CRHR1 rs242941 and GR rs41423247 (BclI). When all subjects were grouped based on family history of mental illness, there was a statistically significant association of CRHR1 rs242941 with family history regardless of depression status (P = 0.043). There was also a statistically significant difference for GR rs41423247 and regularity of menstrual periods (P < 0.000). Although not statistically significant, women with perinatal depression showed a trend towards higher frequency of self-reported menstrual irregularity. No evidence was found for the association of any of the genetic markers with perinatal depression in this study cohort. Instead, the possible genetic links were found in women with positive family history of mental illness and menstrual irregularity, suggesting these could be identifying risk markers for women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 24 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 28%
Psychology 9 13%
Neuroscience 7 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 26 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2016.
All research outputs
#9,144,658
of 11,426,369 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,736
of 2,023 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,893
of 249,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#71
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,426,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,023 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.