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Resistant starch and protein intake enhances fat oxidation and feelings of fullness in lean and overweight/obese women

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
67 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
131 Mendeley
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Title
Resistant starch and protein intake enhances fat oxidation and feelings of fullness in lean and overweight/obese women
Published in
Nutrition Journal, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12937-015-0104-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher L. Gentile, Emery Ward, Jens Juul Holst, Arne Astrup, Michael J. Ormsbee, Scott Connelly, Paul J. Arciero

Abstract

Diets high in either resistant starch or protein have been shown to aid in weight management. We examined the effects of meals high in non-resistant or resistant starch with and without elevated protein intake on substrate utilization, energy expenditure, and satiety in lean and overweight/obese women. Women of varying levels of adiposity consumed one of four pancake test meals in a single-blind, randomized crossover design: 1) waxy maize (control) starch (WMS); 2) waxy maize starch and whey protein (WMS+WP); 3) resistant starch (RS); or 4) RS and whey protein (RS+WP). Total post-prandial energy expenditure did not differ following any of the four test meals (WMS = 197.9 ± 8.9; WMS+WP = 188 ± 8.1; RS = 191.9 ± 8.9; RS+WP = 195.8 ± 8.7, kcals/180 min), although the combination of RS+WP, but not either intervention alone, significantly increased (P <0.01) fat oxidation (WMS = 89.5 ± 5.4; WMS+WP = 84.5 ± 7.2; RS = 97.4 ± 5.4; RS+WP = 107.8 ± 5.4, kcals/180 min). Measures of fullness increased (125 % vs. 45 %) and hunger decreased (55 % vs. 16 %) following WP supplemented versus non-whey conditions (WMS+WP, RS+WP vs. WMS, RS), whereas circulating hunger and satiety factors were not different among any of the test meals. However, peptide YY (PYY) was significantly elevated at 180 min following RS+WP meal. The combined consumption of dietary resistant starch and protein increases fat oxidation, PYY, and enhances feelings of satiety and fullness to levels that may be clinically relevant if maintained under chronic conditions. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02418429.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 67 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Sri Lanka 1 <1%
Unknown 129 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 20%
Student > Bachelor 18 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 12%
Researcher 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 25 19%
Unknown 27 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 9%
Sports and Recreations 12 9%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 34 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 139. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2021.
All research outputs
#189,477
of 19,097,846 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#62
of 1,343 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,816
of 296,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#12
of 199 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,097,846 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,343 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,368 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 199 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.