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Effects of nasal dilator strips on subjective measures of sleep in subjects with chronic nocturnal nasal congestion: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 822)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
9 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of nasal dilator strips on subjective measures of sleep in subjects with chronic nocturnal nasal congestion: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial
Published in
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13223-018-0258-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric J. Schenkel, Renee Ciesla, Gilbert Marava Shanga

Abstract

This exploratory study investigated effects of a new asymmetric butterfly-shaped prototype nasal dilator strip and the currently marketed clear Breathe Right Nasal Strip (BRNS) on subjective measures of nasal congestion and sleep quality. In this randomized, double-blind study, subjects with chronic nasal congestion and sleep difficulties were assigned a BRNS clear strip, an asymmetric butterfly prototype, or an asymmetric butterfly placebo strip without springs, to use nightly for 2 weeks. The main outcomes included change from baseline to days 7 and 14 on the Pittsburgh Insomnia Rating Scale (PIRS), Nocturnal Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (NRQLQ), and Congestion Quantifier Seven-Item Test (CQ7). The intent-to-treat population included 59 subjects. The butterfly and BRNS strips showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement versus placebo on PIRS satisfaction with sleep at day 7 [least square (LS) mean changes: - 0.7, - 0.6, and - 0.2, respectively], and the butterfly strip also showed significant improvement from baseline on this outcome versus placebo at day 14 (- 1.0 vs - 0.5). On the NRQLQ, both the butterfly prototype and BRNS clear were more effective than placebo in improving symptoms on waking at day 7 (LS mean changes: - 7.9, - 7.2, and - 4.1, respectively); the BRNS clear was significantly more effective than placebo in improving sleep problems at day 7 (- 7.4 vs - 4.2). There were no between-treatment differences on the CQ7. All strips were well tolerated. The asymmetric butterfly prototype and BRNS clear strip significantly improved some subjective measures of nasal congestion and sleep compared with placebo in subjects with nasal congestion and sleep difficulties.Trial registration This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT01122849).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Unknown 4 44%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Psychology 1 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 11%
Unknown 4 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2022.
All research outputs
#1,140,925
of 21,892,038 outputs
Outputs from Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
#50
of 822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,538
of 298,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
#5
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,892,038 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 822 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,216 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.