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Translating it into real life: a qualitative study of the cognitions, barriers and supports for key obesogenic behaviors of parents of preschoolers

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2015
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1 tweeter

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Title
Translating it into real life: a qualitative study of the cognitions, barriers and supports for key obesogenic behaviors of parents of preschoolers
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1554-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer Martin-Biggers, Kim Spaccarotella, Nobuko Hongu, Gayle Alleman, John Worobey, Carol Byrd-Bredbenner

Abstract

Little is known about preschool parents' cognitions, barriers, supports and modeling of key obesogenic behaviors, including breakfast, fruit and vegetable consumption, sugary beverage intake, feeding practices, portion sizes, active playtime, reduced screen-time, sleep and selection of child-care centers with characteristics that promote healthy behaviors. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine these factors via survey and focus groups among 139 parents of 2- to 5-year-old children. Standard content analysis procedures were used to identify trends and themes in the focus group data, and Analysis of Variance was used to test for differences between groups in the survey data. Results showed 80% of parents ate breakfast daily, consumed sugary beverages 2.7 ± 2.5SD days per week, and had at least two different vegetables and fruits an average of 5.2 ± 1.8SD and 4.6 ± 2.0SD days per week. Older parents and those with greater education drank significantly fewer sugary drinks. Parents played actively a mean 4.2 ± 2.2 hours/week with their preschoolers, who watched television a mean 2.4 ± 1.7 hours/day. Many parents reported having a bedtime routine for their preschooler and choosing childcare centers that replaced screen-time with active play and nutrition education. Common barriers to choosing healthful behaviors included lack of time; neighborhood safety; limited knowledge of portion size, cooking methods, and ways to prepare healthy foods or play active indoor games; the perceived cost of healthy options, and family members who were picky eaters. Supports for performing healthful behaviors included planning ahead, introducing new foods and behaviors often and in tandem with existing preferred foods and behaviors, and learning strategies from other parents. Future education programs with preschool parents should emphasize supports and encourage parents to share helpful strategies with each other.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 260 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Lebanon 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Saudi Arabia 1 <1%
Unknown 256 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 53 20%
Student > Bachelor 35 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 13%
Researcher 29 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 8%
Other 41 16%
Unknown 48 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 50 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 46 18%
Psychology 23 9%
Social Sciences 20 8%
Sports and Recreations 19 7%
Other 41 16%
Unknown 61 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2015.
All research outputs
#5,567,621
of 6,526,504 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,749
of 6,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,523
of 208,914 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#251
of 274 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,526,504 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,158 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 274 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.