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FRET-SLiM on native autofluorescence: a fast and reliable method to study interactions between fluorescent probes and lignin in plant cell wall

Overview of attention for article published in Plant Methods, August 2018
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Title
FRET-SLiM on native autofluorescence: a fast and reliable method to study interactions between fluorescent probes and lignin in plant cell wall
Published in
Plant Methods, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13007-018-0342-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine Terryn, Gabriel Paës, Corentin Spriet

Abstract

Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex network of polymers making the cell walls of plants. It represents a feedstock of sustainable resources to be converted into fuels, chemicals and materials. Because of its complex architecture, lignocellulose is a recalcitrant material that necessitates some pretreatments and several types of catalysts to be transformed efficiently. In particular, enzymes degrading lignocellulose can become inactivated due to their binding to lignin through non-specific interactions, leading to a loss in catalytic efficiency of industrial processes. Gaining more knowledge in the strength of interactions would allow optimizing enzymes and selecting appropriate pretreatments. Measuring interactions directly in plant cell wall can theoretically be performed using confocal fluorescence techniques by evaluating fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between compatible fluorophores. In this study, autofluorescence of plant cell wall, mainly originating from lignin, was considered as a donor fluorophore while the acceptor was a common rhodamine-based fluorescent probe. To overcome complex plant cell wall fluorescence, which limits FRET analysis by standard techniques, we have developed an original approach, combining spectral and lifetime measurements. It consists in (1) dissecting autofluorescence signal in each spectral channel, (2) optimizing spectral channel choice for lifetime measurements and (3) achieving an unambiguous FRET signature with an autofluorescent donor fluorophore. Interactions between rhodamine-based probes of various sizes and untreated or pretreated wheat sample were evaluated, showing it was possible to discriminate interactions at the nano-scale, revealing some accessibility differences and the effect of pretreatment. SLiM measurement allows precise estimation of the optimal spectral range for FRET measurement. SLiM response allows for the first time doubtless FRET measurements between lignin as a donor, and an acceptor fluorophore with high accuracy and sensitivity related to lifetime decrease studies. As demonstrated, it thus becomes possible to measure interactions of fluorescent probes directly inside plant cell wall samples. This approach can thus be applied to various fields such as lignocellulose deconstruction to optimize the action of enzymes or plant cell wall development to assay in situ the biosynthesis of lignin.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 24%
Researcher 5 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 6 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 7 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2020.
All research outputs
#10,448,694
of 17,464,602 outputs
Outputs from Plant Methods
#532
of 839 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,361
of 283,594 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Plant Methods
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,464,602 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 839 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,594 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them