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Self-perceived ability to cope with stress and depressive mood without smoking predicts successful smoking cessation 12 months later in a quitline setting: a secondary analysis of a randomized trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Self-perceived ability to cope with stress and depressive mood without smoking predicts successful smoking cessation 12 months later in a quitline setting: a secondary analysis of a randomized trial
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5973-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eva Nohlert, John Öhrvik, Ásgeir R. Helgason

Abstract

Telephone-based smoking cessation services ('quitlines') are both effective and cost-effective. Knowledge of modifiable baseline factors in real-life settings with heterogeneous participants is essential for the development and improvement of treatment protocols to assist in telephone-based smoking cessation. The aim was to assess if self-perceived abilities to cope measured at baseline, would predict abstinence at the 12-month follow-up at the Swedish National Tobacco Quitline (SNTQ). The data were retrieved from a previous randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of proactive and reactive service at the SNTQ. Included were 612 clients calling the SNTQ between February 2009 and September 2010. Outcome measures were self-reported point prevalence and 6-month continuous abstinence at the 12-month follow-up. Plausible predictors of smoking cessation were assessed at the first call and in a baseline questionnaire. Self-perceived abilities at baseline were measured by two questions: (1) How likely is it that you will be smoke-free in one year? and (2) How likely are you to be able to handle stress and depressive mood without smoking? The associations between potential predictors and outcome (smoke-free at 12-month follow-up) were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Of the two potential predictors for abstinence at 12-month follow-up, only the perceived ability to handle stress and depressive mood without smoking remained significant in the adjusted analyses (Odds Ratio, OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.00-1.27 for point prevalence and OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.01-1.33 for 6-month continuous abstinence according to intention-to-treat). The overall strongest predictor in the adjusted analyses was smoking status in the week before baseline (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.79-6.09 for point prevalence and OR 3.97, 95% CI 2.01-7.83 for 6-month continuous abstinence). The perceived ability to handle stress and depressive mood without smoking at baseline predicted the subjects' abstinence at the 12-month follow-up. An assessment of/adjustment for stress and depressive mood coping skills may be appropriate in future smoking cessation treatment and research. The treatment protocol can be tailored to individual differences and needs for optimal support. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02085616 . Registered March 10, 2014, 'retrospectively registered'.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Researcher 3 8%
Librarian 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 13 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 11 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 14 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2018.
All research outputs
#3,131,632
of 13,434,786 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,258
of 9,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,510
of 266,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#6
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,434,786 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,269 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,657 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.