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Effect of abacavir on sustained virologic response to HCV treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, Cohere in Eurocoord

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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Citations

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3 Dimensions

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of abacavir on sustained virologic response to HCV treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, Cohere in Eurocoord
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1224-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Colette Smit, Joop Arends, Lars Peters, Antonella d’Arminio Montforte, Francois Dabis, Robert Zangerle, George Daikos, Christina Mussini, Josep Mallolas, Stephane de Wit, Annelies Zinkernagel, Jaime Cosin, Genevieve Chene, Dorthe Raben, Jürgen Rockstroh

Abstract

Contradicting results on the effect of abacavir (ABC) on hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment responses in HIV/HCV co-infected patients have been reported. We evaluated the influence of ABC on the response to pegylated interferon (pegIFN) and ribavirin (RBV)-containing HCV treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients in a large European cohort collaboration, including data from different European countries. HIV/HCV co-infected patients were included if they were aged ≥16 years, received pegIFN alfa-2a or 2b and RBV combination treatment and were enrolled in the COHERE cohort collaboration. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of abacavir on achieving a sustained virologic response (SVR) to HCV treatment. In total 1309 HIV/HCV co-infected patients who had received HCV therapy were included, of whom 490 (37 %) had achieved an SVR. No statistically significant difference was seen for patients using ABC-containing regimens compared to patients using an emtricitabine + tenofovir (FTC + TDF)-containing backbone, which was the most frequently used backbone. In the multivariate analyses, patients using a protease inhibitor (PI)-boosted regimen were less likely to achieve an SVR compared to patients using a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen (OR: 0.61, 95 % CI: 0.41-0.91). The backbone combinations zidovudine&lamivudine (AZT + 3TC) and stavudine&lamivudine (d4t + 3TC) were associated with lower SRV rates (0.45 (0.24-0.82) and 0.46 (0.22-0.96), respectively). The results of this large European cohort study validate that SVR rates are generally not affected by ABC. Use of d4T or AZT as part of the HIV treatment regimen was associated with a lower likelihood of achieving an SVR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 4 21%
Student > Postgraduate 3 16%
Lecturer 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 68%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 16%
Unknown 3 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2015.
All research outputs
#2,715,877
of 6,569,769 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,359
of 3,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,259
of 209,816 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#73
of 163 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,569,769 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,096 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,816 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 163 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.