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Bird naming systems by Akan people in Ghana follow scientific nomenclature with potentials for conservation monitoring

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Bird naming systems by Akan people in Ghana follow scientific nomenclature with potentials for conservation monitoring
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0062-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justus P. Deikumah, Vida Asieduwaa Konadu, Richard Kwafo

Abstract

Studies on indigenous knowledge of fauna particular birds and its potential use in biodiversity conservation and management are rare globally. Characteristics used in creating indigenous bird names in many Ghanaian languages are undocumented. The main aim of this study is to answer the question "whether indigenous bird naming systems by the Akan tribes in Ghana follow scientific nomenclature and whether indigenous Akan bird knowledge can potentially help improve bird conservation efforts in Ghana. Purposive sampling technique was employed in selecting 10 respondents from 25 communities in the five administrative districts in the Central Region. The study was conducted between November 2014 and March 2015. A mixed method approach was adopted in the data collection including key person interviews, focus group discussion, and structured interview supported by a participatory field observation. Indigenous people in the study area have reported 143 species of birds belonging to 44 families representing 57 % of total number of species with known local names in Ghana. The study revealed that just as Latin and common English naming systems, indigenous Akan bird names originated from features of the bird, including plumage, vocalizations or behavioural characteristics and belief systems of the indigenous people. The study also discovered that indigenous people in the study area have distinct names for different species within a particular family for most of the birds they could identify. However, they occasionally assign a single general name for either the entire family or all species therein. The study found evidence to support the prediction that indigenous bird naming systems in the Akan language follow scientific nomenclature. Indigenous knowledge and understanding of birds in the study area can be tapped and used in conservation planning and monitoring of birds. This research thus provides sufficient evidence to prove that indigenous knowledge by the Akan tribes in the study area can be useful in bird conservation and monitoring programs in Ghana. Further research in other Ghanaian languages is recommended.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 6%
Unknown 30 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 7 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 22%
Social Sciences 5 16%
Psychology 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 9 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2020.
All research outputs
#4,729,470
of 17,043,172 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#215
of 661 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,088
of 290,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#18
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,043,172 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 661 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.