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Measuring the positive psychological well-being of people with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional validation of the subjective vitality scale

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
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Title
Measuring the positive psychological well-being of people with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional validation of the subjective vitality scale
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0827-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter C. Rouse, Jet J. J. C. S. Veldhuijzen Van Zanten, Nikos Ntoumanis, George S. Metsios, Chen-an Yu, George D. Kitas, Joan L. Duda

Abstract

People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) frequently suffer from compromised physical and psychological health, however, little is known about positive indicators of health, due to a lack of validated outcome measures. This study aims to validate a clinically relevant outcome measure of positive psychological well-being for people with RA. The first study examined the reliability and factorial validity of the Subjective Vitality Scale (SVS), whilst study 2 tested the instruments convergent validity. In study 1, National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society members (N = 333; M age = 59.82 years SD = 11.00) completed a postal questionnaire. For study 2, participants (N = 106; M age = 56 years, SD = 12 years) were those recruited to a randomized control trial comparing two physical activity interventions who completed a range of health-related questionnaires. The SVS had a high level of internal consistency (α = .93, Rho = .92). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the uni-dimensional factor structure of the questionnaire among RA patients [χ = 1327 (10), CFI = 1.0, SRMSR = .01 and RMSEA = .00 (.00 - .08)]. Support for the scales convergent validity was revealed by significant (p < .05) relationships, in expected directions, with health related quality of life (r = .59), physical function (r = .58), feelings of fatigue (r = -.70), anxiety (r = -.57) and depression (r = -.73). Results from two studies have provided support for the internal consistency, factorial structure and convergent validity of the Subjective Vitality Scale. Researchers and healthcare providers may employ this clinically relevant, freely available and brief assessment with the confidence that it is a valid and reliable measure of positive psychological well-being for RA patients. ClinicalTrials.gov ISRCTN04121489 . Registered 5 September 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 97 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 16%
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Researcher 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 20 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 23 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 12%
Sports and Recreations 10 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 25 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,224,005
of 12,451,992 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#283
of 1,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,250
of 274,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#50
of 276 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,451,992 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,983 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,087 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 276 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.