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Identifying rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs using a simple and reliable in vitro parasite viability fast assay

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Identifying rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs using a simple and reliable in vitro parasite viability fast assay
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0962-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

María Linares, Sara Viera, Benigno Crespo, Virginia Franco, María G. Gómez-Lorenzo, María Belén Jiménez-Díaz, Íñigo Angulo-Barturen, Laura María Sanz, Francisco-Javier Gamo

Abstract

The emergence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins threatens to undermine the effectiveness of artemisinin-based combination anti-malarial therapy. Developing suitable drugs to replace artemisinins requires the identification of new compounds that display rapid parasite killing kinetics. However, no current methods fully meet the requirements to screen large compound libraries for candidates with such properties. This study describes the development and validation of an in vitro parasite viability fast assay for identifying rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs. Parasite killing kinetics were determined by first culturing unlabelled erythrocytes with P. falciparum in the presence of anti-malarial drugs for 24 or 48 h. After removing the drug, samples were added to erythrocytes pre-labelled with intracellular dye to allow their subsequent identification. The ability of viable parasites to re-establish infection in labelled erythrocytes could then be detected by two-colour flow cytometry after tagging of parasite DNA. Thus, double-stained erythrocytes (with the pre-labelled intracellular dye and the parasite DNA dye) result only after establishment of new infections by surviving parasites. The capacity of the test anti-malarial drugs to eliminate viable parasites within 24 or 48 h could, therefore, be determined. The parasite viability fast assay could be completed within 48 h following drug treatment and distinguished between rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs versus those acting more slowly. The assay was validated against ten standard anti-malarial agents with known properties and results correlated well with established methods. An abbreviated assay, suitable for adaption to medium-high throughput screening, was validated and applied against a set of 20 compounds retrieved from the publically available Medicines for Malaria Venture 'Malaria Box'. The quantification of new infections to determine parasite viability offers important advantages over existing methods, and is amenable to medium-high throughput screening. In particular, the parasite viability fast assay allows discrimination of rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial candidates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 64 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 23%
Student > Master 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 26%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 14%
Chemistry 8 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2015.
All research outputs
#2,251,552
of 6,549,866 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#948
of 2,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,048
of 210,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#55
of 160 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,549,866 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 64th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,296 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,715 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 160 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.