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Pathobiology of Tennessee 2017 H7N9 low and high pathogenicity avian influenza viruses in commercial broiler breeders and specific pathogen free layer chickens

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, August 2018
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Title
Pathobiology of Tennessee 2017 H7N9 low and high pathogenicity avian influenza viruses in commercial broiler breeders and specific pathogen free layer chickens
Published in
Veterinary Research, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13567-018-0576-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kateri Bertran, Dong-Hun Lee, Miria F. Criado, Diane Smith, David E. Swayne, Mary J. Pantin-Jackwood

Abstract

In March 2017, H7N9 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus was detected in 2 broiler breeder farms in the state of Tennessee, USA. Subsequent surveillance detected the low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus precursor in multiple broiler breeder farms and backyard poultry in Tennessee and neighboring states. The pathogenesis of the H7N9 LPAI virus was investigated in commercial broiler breeders, the bird type mostly affected in this outbreak. Infectivity, transmissibility, and pathogenesis of the H7N9 HPAI and LPAI viruses were also studied in 4-week-old specific pathogen free (SPF) leghorn chickens. The mean bird infectious doses (BID50) for the LPAI isolate was 5.6 log10 mean egg infectious dose (EID50) for broiler breeders and 4.3 log10 EID50 for SPF layer chickens, and no transmission to contact-exposed birds was observed. In both bird types, virus shedding was almost exclusively from the oropharyngeal route. These findings suggest sub-optimal adaptation for sustained transmission with the H7N9 LPAI isolate, indicating that factors other than the birds genetic background may explain the epidemiology of the outbreak. The BID50 for the HPAI isolate in SPF layer chickens was more than 2 logs lower (<2 log10 EID50) than the LPAI isolate. Also, the HPAI virus was shed by both the oropharyngeal and cloacal routes and transmitted to contacts. Greater susceptibility and easier transmission of the H7N9 HPAI virus are features of the HP phenotype that could favor the spread of HPAI over LPAI viruses during outbreaks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 25%
Other 1 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2019.
All research outputs
#9,104,735
of 14,498,614 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#555
of 891 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,277
of 273,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,498,614 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 891 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,253 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them