↓ Skip to main content

Obstetric and psychosocial risk factors for Australian-born and non-Australian born women and associated pregnancy and birth outcomes: a population based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
322 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Obstetric and psychosocial risk factors for Australian-born and non-Australian born women and associated pregnancy and birth outcomes: a population based cohort study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0681-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah Grace Dahlen, Bryanne Barnett, Jane Kohlhoff, Maya Elizabeth Drum, Ana Maria Munoz, Charlene Thornton

Abstract

One in four Australians is born overseas and 47 % are either born overseas or have a parent who was. Obstetric and psychosocial risk factors for these women may differ. Data from one Sydney hospital (2012-2013) of all births recorded in the ObstetriX™ database were analysed (n = 3,092). Demographics, obstetric and psychosocial risk profile, obstetric interventions and complications and selected maternal and neonatal outcomes were examined for women born in Australia and overseas. Women born in Australia were younger, more likely to be primiparous (28.6 v 27.5 %), be obese (32.0 % v 21.4 %), smoke (19.7 % v 3.0 %), have an epidural (26.2 % v 20.2 %) and were less likely to have gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (6.8 % v 13.7 % when compared to non-Australian born women. The highest rates of GDM, Gestational Hypertension (GH) and maternal anaemia were seen in women born in China, the Philippines and Pakistan respectively. Differences were also seen in psychosocial screening between Australian and non-Australian women with Australian-born women more likely to smoke and report a mental health disorder. There was an association between having an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) ≥ 13 and other psychosocial issues, such as thoughts of self-harm, domestic violence, childhood abuse etc. These women were also less likely to breastfeed. Women with an EPDS ≥ 13 at booking compared to women with EPDS ≤12 had a higher chance of being diagnosed with GDM (AOR 1.85 95 % CI 1.14-3.0). There are significant differences in obstetric and psychosocial risk profiles and maternal and neonatal outcomes between Australian-born and non-Australian born women. In particular there appears to be an association between an EPDS of ≥13 and developing GDM, which warrants further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 322 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 <1%
Zimbabwe 1 <1%
Unknown 320 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 52 16%
Researcher 37 11%
Student > Bachelor 35 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 9%
Student > Postgraduate 15 5%
Other 57 18%
Unknown 97 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 60 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 42 13%
Psychology 36 11%
Social Sciences 27 8%
Unspecified 15 5%
Other 34 11%
Unknown 108 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,242,463
of 20,902,589 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#836
of 3,770 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,387
of 301,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#74
of 309 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,902,589 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,770 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,004 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 309 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.