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Mechanical fibrinogen-depletion supports heparin-free mesenchymal stem cell propagation in human platelet lysate

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, November 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
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Title
Mechanical fibrinogen-depletion supports heparin-free mesenchymal stem cell propagation in human platelet lysate
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0717-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandra Laner-Plamberger, Thomas Lener, Doris Schmid, Doris A. Streif, Tina Salzer, Michaela Öller, Cornelia Hauser-Kronberger, Thorsten Fischer, Volker R. Jacobs, Katharina Schallmoser, Mario Gimona, Eva Rohde

Abstract

Pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) is an efficient alternative to xenogenic supplements for ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in clinical studies. Currently, porcine heparin is used in pHPL-supplemented medium to prevent clotting due to plasmatic coagulation factors. We therefore searched for an efficient and reproducible medium preparation method that avoids clot formation while omitting animal-derived heparin. We established a protocol to deplete fibrinogen by clotting of pHPL in medium, subsequent mechanical hydrogel disruption and removal of the fibrin pellet. After primary culture, bone-marrow and umbilical cord derived MSCs were tested for surface markers by flow cytometry and for trilineage differentiation capacity. Proliferation and clonogenicity were analyzed for three passages. The proposed clotting procedure reduced fibrinogen more than 1000-fold, while a volume recovery of 99.5 % was obtained. All MSC types were propagated in standard and fibrinogen-depleted medium. Flow cytometric phenotype profiles and adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential in vitro were independent of MSC-source or medium type. Enhanced proliferation of MSCs was observed in the absence of fibrinogen but presence of heparin compared to standard medium. Interestingly, this proliferative response to heparin was not detected after an initial contact with fibrinogen during the isolation procedure. Here, we present an efficient, reproducible and economical method in compliance to good manufacturing practice for the preparation of MSC media avoiding xenogenic components and suitable for clinical studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 57 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 10 17%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 19%
Engineering 5 8%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2017.
All research outputs
#4,754,560
of 18,389,745 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#693
of 3,329 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,546
of 292,460 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#45
of 293 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,389,745 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,329 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,460 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 293 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.