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Effective advocacy strategies for influencing government nutrition policy: a conceptual model

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
144 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
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Title
Effective advocacy strategies for influencing government nutrition policy: a conceptual model
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0716-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine Cullerton, Timothy Donnet, Amanda Lee, Danielle Gallegos

Abstract

Influencing public policy change can be difficult and complex, particularly for those with limited power and resources. For any one issue there may be several groups, including the commercial sector and public health advocates advocating from different policy perspectives. However, much of the public health advocacy literature and tools available for those wanting to improve their practice is based on research from one specific perspective of an issue. This approach deprives advocates of potential insight into the most effective levers for this complex and difficult process. To provide a more comprehensive insight into effective levers for influencing public health policy change, a conceptual model for poorly-resourced advocates was developed. The model was developed through the integration and synthesis of policy process and network theories with the results from three studies conducted previously by the authors: a systematic literature review; a social network analysis of influential actors in Australian nutrition policy; plus in-depth interviews with a sample of these actors who had diverse perspectives on influencing nutrition policy. Through understanding the key steps in this model advocates will be better equipped to increase political and public will, and affect positive policy change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 144 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 117 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 18%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Researcher 10 9%
Other 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 23 20%
Unknown 34 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 22 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 14%
Engineering 4 3%
Chemistry 3 3%
Other 20 17%
Unknown 35 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 98. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2021.
All research outputs
#241,735
of 16,936,654 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#68
of 1,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,388
of 281,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,936,654 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,637 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,445 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them