↓ Skip to main content

Return to fertility after extended chemical castration with a GnRH antagonist

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, October 2001
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Return to fertility after extended chemical castration with a GnRH antagonist
Published in
BMC Cancer, October 2001
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-1-18
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janusz W Kostanski, Ge Jiang, Bhas A Dani, Santos B Murty, Wei Qiu, Bruce Schrier, B C Thanoo, Patrick P DeLuca

Abstract

Antagonistic analogues of GnRH for the treatment of prostate cancer may be used clinically in persons for whom return to fertility after such treatment is important or desirable. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the effects of a long term treatment with orntide, a GnRH antagonist, on testosterone levels and fertility in male rats. Two groups of male rats received either 120-day orntide microspheres (8.8 mg orntide/kg/120 days) or vehicle alone (control group). Serum orntide and testosterone levels in both groups were monitored at certain intervals for 9 months from the initiation of treatment. After recovery of normal serum testosterone levels in the treated animals, each rat was housed with two proven breeder, but drug-naive, females. All mates of treated rats achieved pregnancy as rapidly as the mates of control rats although two of the control rats did not sire a litter with either female and one sired only one litter. The mean size of the litters of treated (12.3 offspring per litter) and control (10.6 offspring per litter) were similar. All offspring were grossly normal morphologically and behaviorally during the time to weaning. These results suggest that lack of fertility due to testosterone suppression is reversible after cessation of treatment with this GnRH antagonist.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 27%
Student > Master 3 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 47%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 13%
Computer Science 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2015.
All research outputs
#7,141,408
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,798
of 4,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,863
of 267,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#248
of 725 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,558 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,355 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 725 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.