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Intraoperative Brief Electrical Stimulation of the Spinal Accessory Nerve (BEST SPIN) for prevention of shoulder dysfunction after oncologic neck dissection: a double-blinded, randomized controlled…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, January 2018
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18 Dimensions

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96 Mendeley
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Title
Intraoperative Brief Electrical Stimulation of the Spinal Accessory Nerve (BEST SPIN) for prevention of shoulder dysfunction after oncologic neck dissection: a double-blinded, randomized controlled trial
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40463-017-0244-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brittany Barber, Hadi Seikaly, K. Ming Chan, Rhys Beaudry, Shannon Rychlik, Jaret Olson, Matthew Curran, Peter Dziegielewski, Vincent Biron, Jeffrey Harris, Margaret McNeely, Daniel O’Connell

Abstract

Shoulder dysfunction is common after neck dissection for head and neck cancer (HNC). Brief electrical stimulation (BES) is a novel technique that has been shown to enhance neuronal regeneration after nerve injury by modulating the brain-derived neurotrophic growth factor (BDNF) pathways. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of BES on postoperative shoulder function following oncologic neck dissection. Adult participants with a new diagnosis of HNC undergoing Level IIb +/- V neck dissection were recruited. Those in the treatment group received intraoperative BES applied to the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) after completion of neck dissection for 60 min of continuous 20 Hz stimulation at 3-5 V of 0.1 msec balanced biphasic pulses, while those in the control group received no stimulation (NS). The primary outcome measured was the Constant-Murley Shoulder (CMS) Score, comparing changes from baseline to 12 months post-neck dissection. Secondary outcomes included the change in the Neck Dissection Impairment Index (ΔNDII) score and the change in compound muscle action potential amplitude (ΔCMAP) over the same period. Fifty-four patients were randomized to the treatment or control group with a 1:1 allocation scheme. No differences in demographics, tumor characteristics, or neck dissection types were found between groups. Significantly lower ΔCMS scores were observed in the BES group at 12 months, indicating better preservation of shoulder function (p = 0.007). Only four in the BES group compared to 17 patients in the NS groups saw decreases greater than the minimally important clinical difference (MICD) of the CMS (p = 0.023). However, NDII scores (p = 0.089) and CMAP amplitudes (p = 0.067) between the groups did not reach statistical significance at 12 months. BES participants with Level IIb + V neck dissections had significantly better ΔCMS and ΔCMAP scores at 12 months (p = 0.048 and p = 0.025, respectively). Application of BES to the SAN may help reduce impaired shoulder function in patients undergoing oncologic neck dissection, and may be considered a viable adjunct to functional rehabilitation therapies. Clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT02268344 , October 17, 2014).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 96 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Student > Master 10 10%
Other 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 23 24%
Unknown 26 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 14%
Engineering 6 6%
Unspecified 4 4%
Neuroscience 4 4%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 31 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2020.
All research outputs
#11,933,985
of 18,812,670 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#121
of 375 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,459
of 287,412 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,812,670 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 375 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,412 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them