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Technological properties and probiotic potential of Lactobacillus fermentum strains isolated from West African fermented millet dough

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, November 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

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1 tweeter
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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50 Dimensions

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98 Mendeley
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Title
Technological properties and probiotic potential of Lactobacillus fermentum strains isolated from West African fermented millet dough
Published in
BMC Microbiology, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0602-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Owusu-Kwarteng, Kwaku Tano-Debrah, Fortune Akabanda, Lene Jespersen

Abstract

Throughout Africa, food fermentations are still driven by indigenous microorganisms which influence the nutritional, organoleptic and safety of the final products. However, for improved safety, consistent quality and beneficial health effects, a trend has emerged which involves the isolation of indigenous strains from traditional fermented products to be used as functional starter cultures. These functional starter cultures possess inherent functional characteristics and can contribute to food quality and safety by offering one or more organoleptic, nutritional, technological or health advantage (probiotics). With the aim of selecting potential probiotic starter cultures, Lactobacillus fermentum strains isolated from fermented millet dough were investigated for technological properties and probiotic traits in-vitro. A total of 176 L. fermentum strains were assessed for technological properties including rate of acidification, exopolysaccharide production and amylase activity. Following this, 48 strains showing desirable technological properties were first screened for acid resistance. Sixteen acid resistant strains were assessed for additional probiotic properties including resistance to bile salts, bile salt hydrolysis, antimicrobial property, haemolysis and antibiotics resistance. L. fermentum strains clustered into 3 groups represented by 36 %, 47 % and 17 % as fast, medium and slow acidifiers respectively. About 8 %, 78 % and 14 % of the strains showed strong, weak and no exopolysaccharides production respectively. Amylase activity was generally weak or not detected. After exposure of 48 L. fermentum strains to pH 2.5 for 4 h, 16 strains were considered to be acid resistant. All 16 strains were resistant to bile salt. Four strains demonstrated bile salt hydrolysis. Antimicrobial activity was observed towards Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus but not E. coli and Salmonella enteritidis. Lactobacillus fermentum strains were generally susceptible to antibiotics except 6 strains which showed resistance towards streptomycin, gentamicin and kanamycin. In vitro determination of technological and probiotic properties have shown strain specific difference among L. fermentum strains isolated from fermented millet dough. Sixteen (16) L. fermentum strains have been shown to possess desirable technological and probiotic characteristics in vitro. These strains are therefore good candidates for further studies to elucidate their full potential and possible application as novel probiotic starter cultures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Kazakhstan 1 1%
Unknown 97 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 15%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Master 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Other 20 20%
Unknown 19 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 9%
Engineering 8 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 5%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 22 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2017.
All research outputs
#5,274,715
of 9,821,976 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#800
of 1,578 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,983
of 248,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#29
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,821,976 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,578 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,778 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.