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The SENSE Study (Sleep and Education: learning New Skills Early): a community cognitive-behavioural therapy and mindfulness-based sleep intervention to prevent depression and improve cardiac health…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, November 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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329 Mendeley
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Title
The SENSE Study (Sleep and Education: learning New Skills Early): a community cognitive-behavioural therapy and mindfulness-based sleep intervention to prevent depression and improve cardiac health in adolescence
Published in
BMC Psychology, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40359-015-0096-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joanna M. Waloszek, Orli Schwartz, Julian G. Simmons, Matthew Blake, Laura Blake, Greg Murray, Monika Raniti, Ronald E. Dahl, Neil O’Brien-Simpson, Paul Dudgeon, John Trinder, Nicholas B. Allen

Abstract

Sleep problems are a major risk factor for the emergence of depression in adolescence. The aim of this study was to test whether an intervention for improving sleep habits could prevent the emergence of depression, and improve well-being and cardiovascular indices amongst at-risk adolescents. A longitudinal randomised controlled trial (RCT) is being conducted across Victorian Secondary Schools in Melbourne, Australia. Adolescents (aged 12-17 years) were defined as at-risk for depression if they reported high levels of anxiety and sleep problems on in-school screening questionnaires and had no prior history of depression (assessed by clinical diagnostic interview). Eligible participants were randomised into either a sleep improvement intervention (based on cognitive behavioral and mindfulness principles) or an active control condition teaching study skills. Both programs consisted of seven 90 minute-long sessions over seven weeks. All participants were required to complete a battery of mood and sleep questionnaires, seven-days of actigraphy, and sleep diary entry at pre- and post-intervention. Participants also completed a cardiovascular assessment and two days of saliva collection at pre-intervention. Participants will repeat all assessments at two-year follow up (ongoing). This will be the first efficacy trial of a selective group-based sleep intervention for the prevention of depression in an adolescent community sample. If effective, the program could be disseminated in schools and greatly improve health outcomes for anxious adolescents. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612001177842 . Date of Registration: 06-Nov-2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 329 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 328 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 62 19%
Researcher 45 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 10%
Student > Bachelor 31 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 7%
Other 73 22%
Unknown 61 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 107 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 47 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 7%
Social Sciences 19 6%
Unspecified 12 4%
Other 33 10%
Unknown 87 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,155,223
of 14,574,779 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#279
of 342 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,647
of 238,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#32
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,574,779 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 342 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.5. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,414 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.