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Root iTRAQ protein profile analysis of two Citrus species differing in aluminum-tolerance in response to long-term aluminum-toxicity

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, November 2015
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Title
Root iTRAQ protein profile analysis of two Citrus species differing in aluminum-tolerance in response to long-term aluminum-toxicity
Published in
BMC Genomics, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-2133-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huan-Xin Jiang, Lin-Tong Yang, Yi-Ping Qi, Yi-Bin Lu, Zeng-Rong Huang, Li-Song Chen

Abstract

Limited information is available on aluminum (Al)-toxicity-responsive proteins in woody plant roots. Seedlings of 'Xuegan' (Citrus sinensis) and 'Sour pummelo' (Citrus grandis) were treated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 0 (control) or 1.2 mM AlCl3 · 6H2O (+Al). Thereafter, we investigated Citrus root protein profiles using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). The aims of this work were to determine the molecular mechanisms of plants to deal with Al-toxicity and to identify differentially expressed proteins involved in Al-tolerance. C. sinensis was more tolerant to Al-toxicity than C. grandis. We isolated 347 differentially expressed proteins from + Al Citrus roots. Among these proteins, 202 (96) proteins only presented in C. sinensis (C. grandis), and 49 proteins were shared by the two species. Of the 49 overlapping proteins, 45 proteins were regulated in the same direction upon Al exposure in the both species. These proteins were classified into following categories: sulfur metabolism, stress and defense response, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, protein metabolism, cell transport, biological regulation and signal transduction, cell wall and cytoskeleton metabolism, and jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis. The higher Al-tolerance of C. sinensis may be related to several factors, including: (a) activation of sulfur metabolism; (b) greatly improving the total ability of antioxidation and detoxification; (c) up-regulation of carbohydrate and energy metabolism; (d) enhancing cell transport; (e) decreased (increased) abundances of proteins involved in protein synthesis (proteiolysis); (f) keeping a better balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation; and (g) increasing JA biosynthesis. Our results demonstrated that metabolic flexibility was more remarkable in C. sinenis than in C. grandis roots, thus improving the Al-tolerance of C. sinensis. This provided the most integrated view of the adaptive responses occurring in Al-toxicity roots.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 45%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Psychology 2 6%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2015.
All research outputs
#4,869,134
of 6,581,713 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,146
of 5,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,844
of 193,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#365
of 413 outputs
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