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Change in body weight and body image in young adults: a longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2015
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Title
Change in body weight and body image in young adults: a longitudinal study
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1579-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gicele Costa Mintem, Denise Petrucci Gigante, Bernardo Lessa Horta

Abstract

The goal of this study was to identify the effect of the change in body mass index (BMI) from childhood to adulthood on body image satisfaction at 23 years of age in members of the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort in Pelotas, RS, Brazil. The study used data from the 1986 and 2004-5 follow-up studies. Body shape satisfaction was evaluated using the Stunkard scale. Body shape dissatisfaction was defined as the difference between the figures chosen for the current and ideal body size. BMI z-score changes were calculated as the difference between z-score values at 4 and 23 years of age, using the population internal z-score as standard. The analysis was stratified by sex, and multinomial logistic regression was used in crude and adjusted analyses. A total of 1963 men and 1739 women were analyzed. The mean age of the participants in 2004-5 was 22.7 years. Of the participants exhibiting increased BMI z-scores, 17% perceived themselves as thinner than ideal, whereas 48% perceived themselves as fatter than ideal. The prevalence of dissatisfaction was higher in women because they perceived themselves as fatter than ideal on the three categories of z-score change (≥ + 0.5 sd; -0.49 to + 0.49 sd and ≤ -0.5 sd); 81% of women exhibiting an increased BMI z-score reported dissatisfaction. The analysis adjusted for confounding factors revealed that women with increased BMI z-scores were less prone to feel thinner than ideal. Additionally, the increased risk of dissatisfaction due to perceiving oneself as fatter than ideal was similar between men and women (RRR = 3.52 95% CI: 2.17 to 4.56 and RRR = 4.08 95% CI: 3.00 to 5.56, respectively) using -0.49 to +0.49 sd as the reference category. Individuals exhibiting increased BMI z-scores between 4 and 23 years of age reported higher risks of body dissatisfaction at 23 years of age. This finding is important because body dissatisfaction can cause psychological, social, self-esteem problems, and well-being.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 4 18%
Student > Master 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 6 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Psychology 2 9%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 10 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2015.
All research outputs
#7,173,089
of 8,295,152 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,539
of 6,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#242,921
of 296,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#237
of 262 outputs
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