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“The value of pre‐ and co‐seasonal sublingual immunotherapy in pollen‐induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis”

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Allergy, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
“The value of pre‐ and co‐seasonal sublingual immunotherapy in pollen‐induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis”
Published in
Clinical and Translational Allergy, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13601-015-0061-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pascal Demoly, Moises A Calderon, Thomas B Casale, Hans‐Jørgen Malling, Ulrich Wahn

Abstract

Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a guidelines-approved, disease-modifying treatment option for respiratory allergies, including allergic rhinitis (AR) induced by pollen. The various AIT regimens employed to date in pollen-induced AR can be classified as continuous (i.e. year-round) or discontinuous (i.e. pre-seasonal alone, co-seasonal alone or pre- and co-seasonal). Pre-and co-seasonal regimens are typically used for sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) and have economic and compliance advantages over perennial (year-round) regimens. However, these advantages must not come at the expensive of poor efficacy or safety. The results of recent double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials show that pre- and co-seasonal SLIT is safe and effective in patients with AR induced by grass pollen (treated with a tablet formulation) or by birch pollen (treated with a liquid formulation). Progress in SLIT has been made in defining the optimal dose of major allergen, the administration frequency (daily), the duration of pre-seasonal treatment (four months) and the number of treatment seasons (at least three). Post-marketing, "real-life" trials of pre- and co-seasonal birch or grass pollen SLIT regimens have confirmed the efficacy and safety observed in the clinical trials. In the treatment of pollen-induced AR, pre- and co-seasonal SLIT regimens appear to be at least as effective and safe as perennial SLIT regimens, and are associated with lower costs and good compliance. Good compliance may mean that pre- and co-seasonal SLIT regimens are inherently more effective and safer than perennial SLIT regimens. When considering the pre- and co-seasonal discontinuous regimen in particular, a 300 IR five-grass-pollen formulation is the only SLIT tablet with a clinical development programme having provided evidence of short-term, sustained and post-treatment efficacy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Other 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 11%
Physics and Astronomy 1 6%
Unknown 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2018.
All research outputs
#5,802,612
of 17,824,880 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#313
of 519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,889
of 369,905 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#7
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,824,880 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 519 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 369,905 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.