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Tridax procumbens flavonoids promote osteoblast differentiation and bone formation

Overview of attention for article published in Biological Research, November 2015
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Title
Tridax procumbens flavonoids promote osteoblast differentiation and bone formation
Published in
Biological Research, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40659-015-0056-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Md. Abdullah Al Mamun, Mohammad Jakir Hosen, Kamrul Islam, Amina Khatun, M. Masihul Alam, Md. Abdul Alim Al-Bari

Abstract

Tridax procumbens flavonoids (TPFs) are well known for their medicinal properties among local natives. Besides traditionally used for dropsy, anemia, arthritis, gout, asthma, ulcer, piles, and urinary problems, it is also used in treating gastric problems, body pain, and rheumatic pains of joints. TPFs have been reported to increase osteogenic functioning in mesenchymal stem cells. Our previous study showed that TPFs were significantly suppressed the RANKL-induced differentiation of osteoclasts and bone resorption. However, the effects of TPFs to promote osteoblasts differentiation and bone formation remain unclear. TPFs were isolated from Tridax procumbens and investigated for their effects on osteoblasts differentiation and bone formation by using primary mouse calvarial osteoblasts. TPFs promoted osteoblast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner demonstrated by up-regulation of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. TPFs also upregulated osteoblast differentiation related genes, including osteocalcin, osterix, and Runx2 in primary osteoblasts. TPFs treated primary osteoblast cells showed significant upregulation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) including Bmp-2, Bmp-4, and Bmp-7. Addition of noggin, a BMP specific-antagonist, inhibited TPFs induced upregulation of the osteocalcin, osterix, and Runx2. Our findings point towards the induction of osteoblast differentiation by TPFs and suggested that TPFs could be a potential anabolic agent to treat patients with bone loss-associated diseases such as osteoporosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 10 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 16%
Engineering 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Materials Science 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 11 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2015.
All research outputs
#4,869,122
of 6,581,713 outputs
Outputs from Biological Research
#120
of 197 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,703
of 248,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biological Research
#11
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,581,713 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 197 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,219 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.