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Impulsivity and consideration of future consequences as moderators of the association between emotional eating and body weight status

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

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87 Mendeley
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Title
Impulsivity and consideration of future consequences as moderators of the association between emotional eating and body weight status
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0721-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marc Bénard, France Bellisle, Fabrice Etilé, Gérard Reach, Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Serge Hercberg, Sandrine Péneau

Abstract

Emotional eating (EmE) is characterized by an over consumption of food in response to negative emotions and is associated with an increased weight status. Consideration of Future Consequences (CFC) or a low level of impulsivity could influence the association between EmE and weight status. The objective was to analyze the moderating influence of CFC and impulsivity on the relationship between EmE and BMI. A total of 9974 men and 39,797 women from the NutriNet-Santé cohort study completed the revised 21-item Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire to assess their EmE, the CFC questionnaire (CFC-12) to assess their level of time perspective, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) to assess their impulsivity. Weight and height were self-reported each year over a median follow-up of 5.3 years. The associations between EmE and repeated measures of BMI were estimated by multiple linear mixed-effects regression models stratified by gender, tertiles of the CFC, or tertiles of the BIS-11, taking into account sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. Overall, EmE was positively associated with BMI. CFC and impulsivity did not moderate the effect of EmE on changes of BMI per year, but quantitatively moderated the effect of EmE on overall BMI. In women, the strength of the association between EmE and weight status increased with CFC level. Difference of BMI slopes between a low and a high level of CFC was - 0.43 kg/m2 (95% CI: -0.55, - 0.30) (p < .0001). In addition, the strength of the association between emotional eating and weight status increased with impulsivity level. Difference of BMI slopes between a low and a high level of impulsivity was + 0.37 kg/m2 (95% CI: 0.24, 0.51) (p < .0001). In men, only individuals with a low CFC presented a stronger association of EmE with BMI. Impulsivity and consideration of future consequences moderated the association between emotional eating and body weight status. This study emphasizes the importance of taking into account psychological traits in obesity prevention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 87 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 20%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Researcher 6 7%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 20 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 19 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 13%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 21 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2018.
All research outputs
#1,811,027
of 21,448,133 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#730
of 1,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,221
of 296,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,448,133 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,842 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,392 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them