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Patterns of gene expression and DNA methylation in human fetal and adult liver

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, November 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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3 tweeters

Citations

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Patterns of gene expression and DNA methylation in human fetal and adult liver
Published in
BMC Genomics, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-2066-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan M. Huse, Philip A. Gruppuso, Kim Boekelheide, Jennifer A. Sanders

Abstract

DNA methylation is an important epigenetic control mechanism that has been shown to be associated with gene silencing through the course of development, maturation and aging. However, only limited data are available regarding the relationship between methylation and gene expression in human development. We analyzed the methylome and transcriptome of three human fetal liver samples (gestational age 20-22 weeks) and three adult human liver samples. Genes whose expression differed between fetal and adult numbered 7,673. Adult overexpression was associated with metabolic pathways and, in particular, cytochrome P450 enzymes while fetal overexpression reflected enrichment for DNA replication and repair. Analysis for DNA methylation using the Illumina Infinium 450 K HumanMethylation BeadChip showed that 42 % of the quality filtered 426,154 methylation sites differed significantly between adult and fetal tissue (q ≤ 0.05). Differences were small; 69 % of the significant sites differed in their mean methylation beta value by ≤0.2. There was a trend among all sites toward higher methylation in the adult samples with the most frequent difference in beta being 0.1. Characterization of the relationship between methylation and expression revealed a clear difference between fetus and adult. Methylation of genes overexpressed in fetal liver showed the same pattern as seen for genes that were similarly expressed in fetal and adult liver. In contrast, adult overexpressed genes showed fetal hypermethylation that differed from the similarly expressed genes. An examination of gene region-specific methylation showed that sites proximal to the transcription start site or within the first exon with a significant fetal-adult difference in beta (>0.2) showed an inverse relationship with gene expression. Nearly half of the CpGs in human liver show a significant difference in methylation comparing fetal and adult samples. Sites proximal to the transcription start site or within the first exon that show a transition from hypermethylation in the fetus to hypomethylation or intermediate methylation in the adult are associated with inverse changes in gene expression. In contrast, increases in methylation going from fetal to adult are not associated with fetal-to-adult decreased expression. These findings indicate fundamentally different roles for and/or regulation of DNA methylation in human fetal and adult liver.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 43%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Professor 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Computer Science 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2015.
All research outputs
#2,638,200
of 6,602,221 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#2,555
of 5,190 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,315
of 248,910 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#225
of 412 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,602,221 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,190 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,910 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 412 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.