↓ Skip to main content

Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis and leprosy: case report and literature review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis and leprosy: case report and literature review
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1260-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Angela Bianconcini Trindade, Lana Luiza da Cruz Silva, Lucia Maria Almeida Braz, Valdir Sabbaga Amato, Bernard Naafs, Mirian Nacagami Sotto

Abstract

Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is a dermal complication of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), which may occur after or during treatment. It has been frequently reported from India and the Sudan, but its occurrence in South America has been rarely reported. It may mimic leprosy and its differentiation may be difficult, since both diseases may show hypo-pigmented macular lesions as clinical presentation and neural involvement in histopathological investigations. The co-infection of leprosy and VL has been reported in countries where both diseases are endemic. The authors report a co-infection case of leprosy and VL, which evolved into PKDL and discuss the clinical and the pathological aspects in the patient and review the literature on this disease. We report an unusual case of a 53-year-old female patient from Alagoas, Brazil. She presented with leprosy and a necrotizing erythema nodosum, a type II leprosy reaction, about 3 month after finishing the treatment (MDT-MB) for leprosy. She was hospitalized and VL was diagnosed at that time and she was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B. After 6 months, she developed a few hypo-pigmented papules on her forehead. A granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate throughout the dermis was observed at histopathological examination of the skin biopsy. It consisted of epithelioid histiocytes, lymphocytes and plasma cells with the presence of amastigotes of Leishmania in macrophages (Leishman's bodies). The diagnosis of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis was established because at this time there was no hepatosplenomegaly and the bone marrow did not show Leishmania parasites thus excluding VL. About 2 years after the treatment of PKDL with liposomal amphotericin B the patient is still without PKDL lesions. Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis is a rare dermal complication of VL that mimics leprosy and should be considered particularly in countries where both diseases are endemic. A co-infection must be seriously considered, especially in patients who are non-responsive to treatment or develop persistent leprosy reactions as those encountered in the patient reported here.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sri Lanka 1 1%
Unknown 70 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Researcher 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 20 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 6%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 21 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2015.
All research outputs
#4,881,470
of 6,597,995 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,279
of 3,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,229
of 248,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#112
of 147 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,597,995 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,110 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,947 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 147 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.