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Feasibility study of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxiety disorders in a Japanese setting

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, September 2018
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Feasibility study of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxiety disorders in a Japanese setting
Published in
BMC Research Notes, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3744-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mitsuhiro Sado, Sunre Park, Akira Ninomiya, Yasuko Sato, Daisuke Fujisawa, Joichiro Shirahase, Masaru Mimura

Abstract

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) could be a treatment option for anxiety disorders. Although its effectiveness under conditions of low pharmacotherapy rates has been demonstrated, its effectiveness under condition of high pharmacotherapy rate is still unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate effectiveness of MBCT under the context of high pharmacotherapy rates. A single arm with pre-post comparison design was adopted. Those who had any diagnosis of anxiety disorders, between the ages of 20 and 74, were included. Participants attended 8 weekly 2-hour-long sessions followed by 2 monthly boosters. Evaluation was conducted at baseline, in the middle, at end of the intervention, and at follow-up. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)-state was set as the primary outcome. Pre-post analyses with mixed-effect models repeated measures were conducted. Fourteen patients were involved. The mean age was 45.0, and 71.4% were female. The mean change in the STAI-state at every point showed statistically significant improvement. The STAI-trait also showed improvement at a high significance level from the very early stages. The participants showed significant improvement at least one point in some other secondary outcomes. Trial registration Retrospectively registered at the University Hospital Medical Information Network on 1st August 2013 (ID: UMIN000011347).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Student > Master 5 18%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 11 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 7 25%
Psychology 6 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 9 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2019.
All research outputs
#8,351,409
of 14,484,925 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,363
of 3,271 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,890
of 272,559 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,484,925 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,271 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,559 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them