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Blunted cardiac reactivity to psychological stress associated with higher trait anxiety: a study in peacekeepers

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, November 2015
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2 tweeters

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16 Dimensions

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Blunted cardiac reactivity to psychological stress associated with higher trait anxiety: a study in peacekeepers
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12868-015-0216-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gabriela Guerra Leal Souza, Ana Carolina Ferraz Mendonça-de-Souza, Antônio Fernando Araújo Duarte, Nastassja Lopes Fischer, Wanderson Fernandes Souza, Evandro Silva Freire Coutinho, Ivan Figueira, Eliane Volchan

Abstract

Both exaggerated and diminished reactivity to stress can be maladaptive. Previous studies have shown that performing increasingly difficult tasks leads first to increased reactivity and then to a blunted response when success is impossible. Our aim was to investigate the influence of trait anxiety on cardiac and cortisol response to and recovery from a standardized psychosocial stress task (Trier Social Stress Task) in a homogeneous sample of healthy peacekeepers. We hypothesized that participants with higher trait anxiety would show blunted reactivity during the performance of an overwhelmingly difficult and stressful task. Participants (N = 50) delivered a speech and performed an arithmetic task in the presence of critical evaluators. Cortisol samples and electrocardiogram data were collected. Participants completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait version, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) and the Military Peace Force Stressor Inventory. For heart rate, the findings showed that peacekeepers with higher trait anxiety reacted less to the speech task (p = 0.03) and to the arithmetic task (p = 0.008) than those with lower trait anxiety. Trait anxiety did not modulate cortisol responses to the task. Despite the high trait anxiety group having higher PCL-C scores than the low trait anxiety group (p < 0.0001), this did not influence the cardiac results. We concluded that individuals with higher trait anxiety had less tachycardia in response to acute psychological stress than those with lower trait anxiety. The present results point to a higher risk for more anxious individuals of a maladaptive reaction to stressful events.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 72 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Master 6 8%
Professor 4 5%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Other 15 21%
Unknown 18 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 19 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 12%
Neuroscience 7 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Sports and Recreations 3 4%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 23 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2015.
All research outputs
#8,792,185
of 11,426,369 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#652
of 946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,934
of 308,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#28
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,426,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 946 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.