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CBP binding outside of promoters and enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

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9 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

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50 Mendeley
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Title
CBP binding outside of promoters and enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13072-015-0042-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philge Philip, Ann Boija, Roshan Vaid, Allison M. Churcher, David J. Meyers, Philip A. Cole, Mattias Mannervik, Per Stenberg

Abstract

CREB-binding protein (CBP, also known as nejire) is a transcriptional co-activator that is conserved in metazoans. CBP plays an important role in embryonic development and cell differentiation and mutations in CBP can lead to various diseases in humans. In addition, CBP and the related p300 protein have successfully been used to predict enhancers in both humans and flies when they occur with monomethylation of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me1). Here, we compare CBP chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data from Drosophila S2 cells with modENCODE data and show that CBP is bound at genomic sites with a wide range of functions. As expected, we find that CBP is bound at active promoters and enhancers. In addition, we find that the strongest CBP sites in the genome are found at Polycomb response elements embedded in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylated (H3K27me3) chromatin, where they correlate with binding of the Pho repressive complex. Interestingly, we find that CBP also binds to most insulators in the genome. At a subset of these, CBP may regulate insulating activity, measured as the ability to prevent repressive H3K27 methylation from spreading into adjacent chromatin. We conclude that CBP could be involved in a much wider range of functions than has previously been appreciated, including Polycomb repression and insulator activity. In addition, we discuss the possibility that a common role for CBP at all functional elements may be to regulate interactions between distant chromosomal regions and speculate that CBP is controlling higher order chromatin organization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 48 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 26%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 34%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2015.
All research outputs
#1,406,112
of 7,366,802 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#113
of 225 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,224
of 284,948 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#9
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,366,802 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 225 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,948 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.