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Ethnicity-specific epigenetic variation in naïve CD4+ T cells and the susceptibility to autoimmunity

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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17 tweeters

Citations

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44 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Ethnicity-specific epigenetic variation in naïve CD4+ T cells and the susceptibility to autoimmunity
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13072-015-0037-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick Coit, Mikhail Ognenovski, Elizabeth Gensterblum, Kathleen Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Jonathan D. Wren, Amr H. Sawalha

Abstract

Genetic and epigenetic variability contributes to the susceptibility and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. T cells play an important role in several autoimmune conditions, including lupus, which is more common and more severe in people of African descent. To investigate inherent epigenetic differences in T cells between ethnicities, we characterized genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in naïve CD4+ T cells in healthy African-Americans and European-Americans, and then confirmed our findings in lupus patients. Impressive ethnicity-specific clustering of DNA methylation profiling in naïve CD4+ T cells was revealed. Hypomethylated loci in healthy African-Americans were significantly enriched in pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory genes. We also found hypomethylated genes in African-Americans to be disproportionately related to autoimmune diseases including lupus. We then confirmed that these genes, such as IL32, CD226, CDKN1A, and PTPRN2 were similarly hypomethylated in lupus patients of African-American compared to European-American descent. Using patch DNA methylation and luciferase reporter constructs, we showed that methylation of the IL32 promoter region reduces gene expression in vitro. Importantly, bisulfite DNA sequencing demonstrated that cis-acting genetic variants within and directly disrupting CpG sites account for some ethnicity-specific variability in DNA methylation. Ethnicity-specific inherited epigenetic susceptibility loci in CD4+ T cells provide clues to explain differences in the susceptibility to autoimmunity and possibly other T cell-related diseases between populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 42 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 30%
Researcher 8 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 21%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2021.
All research outputs
#3,406,504
of 20,163,854 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#143
of 531 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,867
of 393,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#31
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,163,854 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 531 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,510 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.