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Two sides of the same coin – an interview study of Swedish obstetricians’ experiences using ultrasound in pregnancy management

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2015
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1 tweeter

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Two sides of the same coin – an interview study of Swedish obstetricians’ experiences using ultrasound in pregnancy management
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0743-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annika Åhman, Margareta Persson, Kristina Edvardsson, Ann Lalos, Sophie Graner, Rhonda Small, Ingrid Mogren

Abstract

The extended use of ultrasound that is seen in maternity care in most Western countries has not only affected obstetric care but also impacted on the conception of the fetus in relation to the pregnant woman. This situation has also raised concerns regarding the pregnant woman's reproductive freedom. The purpose of this study was to explore Swedish obstetricians' experiences and views on the role of obstetric ultrasound particularly in relation to clinical management of complicated pregnancy, and in relation to situations where the interests of maternal and fetal health conflict. A qualitative study design was applied, and data were collected in 2013 through interviews with 11 obstetricians recruited from five different obstetric clinics in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The theme that emerged in the analysis 'Two sides of the same coin' depicts the view of obstetric ultrasound as a very important tool in obstetric care while it also was experienced as having given rise to new and challenging issues in the management of pregnancy. This theme was built on three categories: I. Ultrasound is essential and also demanding; II. A woman's health interest is prioritised in theory, but not always in practice; and III. Ultrasound is rewarding but may also cause unwarranted anxiety. The widespread use of ultrasound in obstetric care has entailed new challenges for clinicians due to enhanced possibilities to diagnose and treat fetal conditions, which in turn might conflict with the health interests of the pregnant woman. There is a need for further ethical discussions regarding the obstetrician's position in management of situations where maternal and fetal health interests conflict. The continuing advances in the potential of ultrasound to impact on pregnancy management will also increase the need for adequate and appropriate information and counselling. Together with other health care professionals, obstetricians therefore need to develop improved ways of enabling pregnant women and their partners to make informed decisions regarding pregnancy management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
New Zealand 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 13 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Philosophy 2 4%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2015.
All research outputs
#3,145,482
of 6,606,474 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,035
of 1,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,058
of 250,047 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#50
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,606,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,434 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,047 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.