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Teacher and pupil perspectives on the use of Virtual Field Trips as physically active lessons

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, November 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Teacher and pupil perspectives on the use of Virtual Field Trips as physically active lessons
Published in
BMC Research Notes, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1698-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

E. Norris, N. Shelton, S. Dunsmuir, O. Duke-Williams, E. Stamatakis

Abstract

Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) are emerging physically active lessons that combine curriculum content with globe-based movement using interactive whiteboards. No research has yet examined the acceptability of these sessions by target users. This study aimed to (1) assess current physically active lesson teaching practices, (2) assess teacher attitudes towards VFTs and (3) investigate pupil perceptions of VFTs. Data was collected from teaching staff interviews (n = 12) and three elementary school pupil focus groups (k = 3, n = 18), with all participants provided with a sample VFT session. Thematic analysis was used to analyse data. Teachers described VFTs as a flexible teaching tool, allowing inclusive learning across abilities and a range of taught subjects. They stressed a packed curriculum may make delivering VFT sessions problematic and warned that some teachers may be resistant to their use of technology. Pupils enjoyed the ability to move in the classroom and the ability to share a new teaching experience with their peers. This work suggests positive attitudes towards VFTs as novel, physically active lessons and identifies potential teacher concerns for consideration in forthcoming intervention planning. Future experimental work will assess if these attitudes persist during longitudinal exposure to VFTs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 20%
Student > Bachelor 11 16%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 4%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 13 19%
Psychology 9 13%
Sports and Recreations 9 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 15 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2015.
All research outputs
#2,246,492
of 8,691,675 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#527
of 2,145 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,437
of 300,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#33
of 197 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,691,675 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,145 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,902 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 197 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.